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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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ARCUS TIBERII erected in 16 A.D. to commemorate the recovery of the standards which had been captured by the Germans at the defeat of Varus in 9 A.D. (Tac. Ann. ii.41). It stood at the north-west corner of the basilica Julia, on the north side of the Sacra via, which was made narrower at this point by having its curb bent toward the south. The arch was single, as represented on a relief on the arch of Constantine (HC 74, fig. 28), and was approached by steps from the level of the forum. Various architectural fragments were discovered in 1835 and 1848, with parts of the inscription The fragments of inscriptions supposed to have belonged to the arch have as a fact (as is pointed out in CIL cit., following RGDA 2, 127) no connection with it-despite the statement in HC cit. But the arch, which, as Tacitus tells us, was propter aedem Saturni, has certainly been correctly identified (AJA 1912, 398). (CIL vi. 906, 31422, 31575), and its concrete foundations, 9 metres long and 6.3 wide
ARCUS TIBERII erected in 16 A.D. to commemorate the recovery of the standards which had been captured by the Germans at the defeat of Varus in 9 A.D. (Tac. Ann. ii.41). It stood at the north-west corner of the basilica Julia, on the north side of the Sacra via, which was made narrower at this point by having its curb bent toward the south. The arch was single, as represented on a relief on the arch of Constantine (HC 74, fig. 28), and was approached by steps from the level of the forum. Various architectural fragments were discovered in 1835 and 1848, with parts of the inscription The fragments of inscriptions supposed to have belonged to the arch have as a fact (as is pointed out in CIL cit., following RGDA 2, 127) no connection with it-despite the statement in HC cit. But the arch, which, as Tacitus tells us, was propter aedem Saturni, has certainly been correctly identified (AJA 1912, 398). (CIL vi. 906, 31422, 31575), and its concrete foundations, 9 metres long and 6.3 wide,