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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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cus (Cic. de div. i. 101 ; BC 1905, 208-210; Me1. 1908, 238-240), originally covered the space between the atrium and the Palatine, but was gradually encroached upon, and finally disappeared entirely, as it would seem. The domus Publica (Suet. Caes. 46) still continued to be the residence of the pontifex maximus until Augustus, on assuming that office in 12 B.C., transferred it to the Palatine (Cass. Dio liv. 27) and presented the domus Publica to the Vestals (Jahrb. d. Inst. 1889, 247). In 36 B.C. Domitius Calvinus built the marble Regia, an entirely separate structure. After the republic, therefore, the precinct of Vesta included the temple, the grove, and the actual dwelling of the Vestals, to which the name atrium was generally restricted. This name would lead us to infer that the court, atrium, was the most prominent part of the precinct, and it was certainly large enough for meetings of the senate (Serv. Aen. vii. 153: ad atrium Vestae conveniebat (senatus) quod a templo remotum
is a room in which an archaic altar, belonging to the Republican house, has been found. On the south side of the courtyard is a group of rooms used for household purposes, after which comes a series of finely decorated rooms. At the west end are some rooms which are cut off from the courtyard, and may, it is thought, have served for the cult of the Lares (cf. LARES, AEDES); and further west still are rooms probably used for the cult of Vesta in connection with the temple. Two hoards of coins were found in the house-830 Saxon coins, dating down to the middle of the tenth century, in 1883 (NS 1883, 487-514), and 397 gold coins dating from 335 to 467-472 A.D. in 1899 (ib. 1899, 327-330). A statue of Numa with a head of an ideal Greek type of the fifth century B.C., with a space for a bronze beard, was found in the house of the Vestals. As the body shows, it probably belongs to the period of Trajan (BC 1919, 211-224). The head shows evidence of the rite of resectio (see LUCUS FURRINAE).
3; Serv. Aen. vii. 153). This precinct contained the temple of VESTA (q.v.), the dwelling of the Vestals, the sacred grove, the domus Publica or official residence of the pontifex maximus, and the REGIA (q.v.) itself or house of the king. This group was called both Regia and atrium Vestae (Ov. Fast. vi. 263-264: hic locus exiguus qui sustinet atria Vestae [ tunc erat intonsi regia magna Numae; cf. the confused terms atrium regium (Liv. xxvi. 27. 3; xxvii. 11. 16, in reference to the fire of 210 B.C.) and regia Vestae (CIL vi. 511). The grove, lucus (Cic. de div. i. 101 ; BC 1905, 208-210; Me1. 1908, 238-240), originally covered the space between the atrium and the Palatine, but was gradually encroached upon, and finally disappeared entirely, as it would seem. The domus Publica (Suet. Caes. 46) still continued to be the residence of the pontifex maximus until Augustus, on assuming that office in 12 B.C., transferred it to the Palatine (Cass. Dio liv. 27) and presented the domus Publica
d terms atrium regium (Liv. xxvi. 27. 3; xxvii. 11. 16, in reference to the fire of 210 B.C.) and regia Vestae (CIL vi. 511). The grove, lucus (Cic. de div. i. 101 ; BC 1905, 208-210; Me1. 1908, 238-240), originally covered the space between the atrium and the Palatine, but was gradually encroached upon, and finally disappeared entirely, as it would seem. The domus Publica (Suet. Caes. 46) still continued to be the residence of the pontifex maximus until Augustus, on assuming that office in 12 B.C., transferred it to the Palatine (Cass. Dio liv. 27) and presented the domus Publica to the Vestals (Jahrb. d. Inst. 1889, 247). In 36 B.C. Domitius Calvinus built the marble Regia, an entirely separate structure. After the republic, therefore, the precinct of Vesta included the temple, the grove, and the actual dwelling of the Vestals, to which the name atrium was generally restricted. This name would lead us to infer that the court, atrium, was the most prominent part of the precinct, and
is a room in which an archaic altar, belonging to the Republican house, has been found. On the south side of the courtyard is a group of rooms used for household purposes, after which comes a series of finely decorated rooms. At the west end are some rooms which are cut off from the courtyard, and may, it is thought, have served for the cult of the Lares (cf. LARES, AEDES); and further west still are rooms probably used for the cult of Vesta in connection with the temple. Two hoards of coins were found in the house-830 Saxon coins, dating down to the middle of the tenth century, in 1883 (NS 1883, 487-514), and 397 gold coins dating from 335 to 467-472 A.D. in 1899 (ib. 1899, 327-330). A statue of Numa with a head of an ideal Greek type of the fifth century B.C., with a space for a bronze beard, was found in the house of the Vestals. As the body shows, it probably belongs to the period of Trajan (BC 1919, 211-224). The head shows evidence of the rite of resectio (see LUCUS FURRINAE).
i. A. 502-504; DR 275-293. All previous work has been superseded by Dr. Esther B. Van Deman's The Atrium Vestae, Washington, the Carnegie Institution, 1909). Cf. also ASA 154, 155; HFP 46-48. These excavations show some remains of the republican atrium, that is, the house of the Vestals, immediately south of the temple, adjoining the domus Publica on the east, with the same north and south orientation. This indicates the antiquity of both, though almost no remains earlier than the second century B.C. are now visible. They consist of a small court with rows of rooms on the south and west sides, with walls and pavements still visible at some points under the north-west corner of the latest building; that of the court is a lithostroton pavement of the Sullan period (JRS 1922, 29). The domus Publica seems to have been larger than the house of the Vestals, and to have occupied all the space between the Sacra via and the earlier Nova via. Its remains, forming virtually a part of the ori
is a room in which an archaic altar, belonging to the Republican house, has been found. On the south side of the courtyard is a group of rooms used for household purposes, after which comes a series of finely decorated rooms. At the west end are some rooms which are cut off from the courtyard, and may, it is thought, have served for the cult of the Lares (cf. LARES, AEDES); and further west still are rooms probably used for the cult of Vesta in connection with the temple. Two hoards of coins were found in the house-830 Saxon coins, dating down to the middle of the tenth century, in 1883 (NS 1883, 487-514), and 397 gold coins dating from 335 to 467-472 A.D. in 1899 (ib. 1899, 327-330). A statue of Numa with a head of an ideal Greek type of the fifth century B.C., with a space for a bronze beard, was found in the house of the Vestals. As the body shows, it probably belongs to the period of Trajan (BC 1919, 211-224). The head shows evidence of the rite of resectio (see LUCUS FURRINAE).