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cond section of the palace lies to the south-east of the first, and appears to have contained the residential apartments. From a curved terrace on the south-west a large arched opening (now closed, but visible in drawings of the sixteenth century (Ill. 18); cf. esp. Heemskerck ii. 92 , 93; Wyngaerde's panorama repr. in Mel. 1906, 179, pls. iv.-vii.) led into a courtyard, surrounded by a colonnade, behind which were rooms of elaborate plan. They were excavated and plundered at the end of the eighteenth century (Guattani, Mon. Ined. 1785 passim; the plans are not altogether correct), and were then filled up again. Three rooms on the north-east side of the peristyle are accessible: the central one has an interesting barrel vault (not a dome with spherical pendentives, as Rivoira, RA 108-109, thinks), while those on each side are octagonal and domed. The construction, again, belongs to the period of Domitian, though the brick-stamps betoken later restoration (NS 1893, 358, 419). From the
or the parts erected by these several Emperors' (Pl. 143). This seems to state the case as clearly as possible. DOMUS PALATINA (q.v.) is also used for the whole group. For the original house of Augustus, see DOMUS AUGUSTI, and for the remains of the DOMUS TRANSITORIA and DOMUS AUREA, see those articles. It is clear, from examination of the construction, that what is now existing above ground is due in main to a great restoration by Domitian's architect Rabirius, which was only completed in 92 A.D. (Mart. vii. 56. 2: (Rabiri) Parrhasiam mira qui struis arte domum; cf. x. 71, a poem on his parents' death). The cornices have two rings between the dentils, a characteristic of Domitian's work (BC 1918, 35). Two fragments of a marble epistyle, bearing an inscription in letters once filled with bronze, which now lie at the main entrance of the palace and were doubtless found there, are attributed to the reign of Vespasian (CILvi. 31496a) but might betterbe assigned to the beginning of that
en the dentils, a characteristic of Domitian's work (BC 1918, 35). Two fragments of a marble epistyle, bearing an inscription in letters once filled with bronze, which now lie at the main entrance of the palace and were doubtless found there, are attributed to the reign of Vespasian (CILvi. 31496a) but might betterbe assigned to the beginning of that of Domitian (81-83 A.D.). The inscription may have related to the construction of a porticus. The building is described by Martial, writing in 93 A.D., as a lofty pile (viii. 36) ; in ib. 39 he alludes to the completion of the triclinium, of which Statius (Silv. iv. 2) also speaks, in a poem of extravagant praise; cf. also Mart. i. 70; viii. 60; ix. 13, 79; xii. 15. Suetonius (Dom. 14) tells us that Domitian had the walls of the porticoes in which he usually walked lined with selenite (phengites lapis), so that he would see what was going on behind him; but otherwise we have little definite information, and practically nothing about the f
etre in width, were made in the wall itself at regular intervals, and within one of these openings is a basin or trough with two compartments. It is probable that this enclosure was a vivarium, built to contain wild animals, a sort of private menagerie of the emperors. The site of the church of S. Cesario in Palatio, between the middle of the twelfth and the beginning of the fifteenth century, has recently been fixed by Hulsen about the middle of the 'stadium,' while from the seventh to the middle of the ninth century the name belonged to an oratory in the Lateran palace. This does not mean that the church on the Palatine was not of older origin ; but the frescoes of the Byzantine period in one of the chambers under the Villa Mills described by Bartoli (BCr 1907, 200-204) must then be attributed to the monastery connected with the church (Hulsen in Misc. Ehrle ii. (Studi e Testi vol. 36) 377-403; HCh 232-233; RAP iii. 45-48). Excavations have been made and recorded at various times sin
6. 2: (Rabiri) Parrhasiam mira qui struis arte domum; cf. x. 71, a poem on his parents' death). The cornices have two rings between the dentils, a characteristic of Domitian's work (BC 1918, 35). Two fragments of a marble epistyle, bearing an inscription in letters once filled with bronze, which now lie at the main entrance of the palace and were doubtless found there, are attributed to the reign of Vespasian (CILvi. 31496a) but might betterbe assigned to the beginning of that of Domitian (81-83 A.D.). The inscription may have related to the construction of a porticus. The building is described by Martial, writing in 93 A.D., as a lofty pile (viii. 36) ; in ib. 39 he alludes to the completion of the triclinium, of which Statius (Silv. iv. 2) also speaks, in a poem of extravagant praise; cf. also Mart. i. 70; viii. 60; ix. 13, 79; xii. 15. Suetonius (Dom. 14) tells us that Domitian had the walls of the porticoes in which he usually walked lined with selenite (phengites lapis), so that h
PLAUTIANI, TEMPLUM ELAGABALI, DIAETAE MAMMAEAE, SICILIA, STABULUM, etc. In Christian times the edges of the hill were occupied by churches, but the central portion (perhaps owing to the destruction caused by the earthquake of Leo IV) seems to have been almost entirely left alone. Both the Anonymus Einsiedlensis and the writers of the Mirabilia barely mention it, and we know very little about its mediaeval history, though the pallacium divi Augusti described by Magister Gregorius in the twelfth century (JRS 1919, 31, 52) is probably this palace This is Rushforth's view. Hulsen, however, points out that the 'Palatium LX imperatorum ' (JRS cit. 36, 53) must be the Palatine; cf. the reference to S. Cesario in Palatio in the list of twenty abbeys given by Petrus Mallius and Johannes Diaconus as 'in palatio LXX regum' (HCh 232). The ' Pallacium divi Augusti' is more likely to be near the Lateran, as the connection of the aqueduct with the Porta Asinaria shows; while the inscription is a m
ero 31: 'we are told by Suetonius that Nero caused sea-water to be brought from the sea to the Palatine,' which really concerns the domus Aurea. Finally Domitian sunk his foundations through the whole group of buildings when he raised the general level of this part of the imperial palace (ZA 202, 203, 205). Under the 'lararium ' Boni discovered the remains of a house of the first century B.C., which he wrongly attributed to Catiline, below which were terra-cottas of two still earlier houses (third and fifth century B.C.). The lower floor, accessible by a staircase, and originally lighted mainly from the north-east (where, under the foundations of the platform of the palace, other remains may still be seen), consists of a number of small rooms, with paintings of a transitional period between the first and second Pompeian styles, in which columns have begun to make their appearance, and there is an attempt at perspective. The pavements are of simple mosaic. One room also has a fine lune
h five chambers, to which Boni (JRS 1913, 246-247, cf. YW 1912, 11) wrongly referred the statement of Suetonius, Nero 31: 'we are told by Suetonius that Nero caused sea-water to be brought from the sea to the Palatine,' which really concerns the domus Aurea. Finally Domitian sunk his foundations through the whole group of buildings when he raised the general level of this part of the imperial palace (ZA 202, 203, 205). Under the 'lararium ' Boni discovered the remains of a house of the first century B.C., which he wrongly attributed to Catiline, below which were terra-cottas of two still earlier houses (third and fifth century B.C.). The lower floor, accessible by a staircase, and originally lighted mainly from the north-east (where, under the foundations of the platform of the palace, other remains may still be seen), consists of a number of small rooms, with paintings of a transitional period between the first and second Pompeian styles, in which columns have begun to make their appe
told by Suetonius that Nero caused sea-water to be brought from the sea to the Palatine,' which really concerns the domus Aurea. Finally Domitian sunk his foundations through the whole group of buildings when he raised the general level of this part of the imperial palace (ZA 202, 203, 205). Under the 'lararium ' Boni discovered the remains of a house of the first century B.C., which he wrongly attributed to Catiline, below which were terra-cottas of two still earlier houses (third and fifth century B.C.). The lower floor, accessible by a staircase, and originally lighted mainly from the north-east (where, under the foundations of the platform of the palace, other remains may still be seen), consists of a number of small rooms, with paintings of a transitional period between the first and second Pompeian styles, in which columns have begun to make their appearance, and there is an attempt at perspective. The pavements are of simple mosaic. One room also has a fine lunette with two grif
353-355). On the south-west of the Vigna Barberini lies the church of S. Bonaventura built over a large reservoir, which was supplied by a branch of the AQUA CLAUDIA (q.v.; see also ARCUS NERONIANI), and between it and the ' Stadium ' was a nymphaeum. Below the summit of the hill on the south-east slope are remains of private houses, attributable to the same general period. Inscriptions of slaves and freedmen, including a priest of Mithras, connected with the domus Augustiana, from the second century onwards, are published in CIL vi. 2271, 8640-52; cf. xv. 1860, 7246. For the representation of the domus Augustiana (Flavia) in the Marble Plan, see Hulsen in DAP 2. xi. I I I--20; and pls. ii., iii. Which, if any, of the paintings drawn by Bartoli and others (PBS vii. 1-62 and especially 33 sqq.; viii. 35 sqq.) in the course of the Farnese excavations belong to the buildings of the period of Domitian is a difficult question, as no remains of paintings are now visible and the records of
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