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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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BIBLIOTHECA TEMPLI D. AUGUSTI also called bibliotheca Templi novi, the library established by Tiberius in the temple of Augustus, and dedicated after his death (Suet. Tib. 74; Plin. NH xxxiv. 43). This library was burned with the temple under Vespasian or Domitian and restored by the latter. From a reference in Martial (xii. 8), it has been conjectured that the books themselves were removed after this fire and not actually replaced until just before the publication of this epigram in 101 A.D. (Friedlander, ad loc.). It is possible that this is the same library that was called bibliotheca domus Tiberianae in the fourth century (cf. Boyd 10-15, 34). For the discussion of the identification of this library, see AUGUSTUS, TEMPLUM.
BIBLIOTHECA TEMPLI D. AUGUSTI also called bibliotheca Templi novi, the library established by Tiberius in the temple of Augustus, and dedicated after his death (Suet. Tib. 74; Plin. NH xxxiv. 43). This library was burned with the temple under Vespasian or Domitian and restored by the latter. From a reference in Martial (xii. 8), it has been conjectured that the books themselves were removed after this fire and not actually replaced until just before the publication of this epigram in 101 A.D. (Friedlander, ad loc.). It is possible that this is the same library that was called bibliotheca domus Tiberianae in the fourth century (cf. Boyd 10-15, 34). For the discussion of the identification of this library, see AUGUSTUS, TEMPLUM.