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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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DUS MONETAE (qq.v.), which led to the top of the hill from the forum side. The Capitolium proper, or south summit, was occupied by the most famous of all Roman temples, that of IUPPITER OPTIMUS MAXIMUS CAPITOLINUS (q.v.), and the AREA CAPITOLINA (q.v.) or space in which this temple and others stood; while on the north summit were the Arx and temple of IUNO MONETA (q.v.). During the first centuries of the republic, private dwellings were erected to some extent on the hill, for in the year 390 B.C. there was a guild of those who dwelt in Capitolio atque arce (Liv. v. 50); and after the treason of Manlius, a law was passed which forbade any patrician to live on either summit (Liv. vi. 20). In spite of such prohibitions, the gradual destruction of the fortifications and the demands of a rapidly increasing population led to continual encroachments upon this quasi- sacred hill. In 93 B.C. a considerable tract, which had belonged to the priests, was sold and came into private pos
iv. v. 50); and after the treason of Manlius, a law was passed which forbade any patrician to live on either summit (Liv. vi. 20). In spite of such prohibitions, the gradual destruction of the fortifications and the demands of a rapidly increasing population led to continual encroachments upon this quasi- sacred hill. In 93 B.C. a considerable tract, which had belonged to the priests, was sold and came into private possession (Oros. v. 18; cf. also Cic. pro Mil. 64). By the middle of the first century the whole hill, with the exception of the area Capitolina, the actual sites of the temples, and the steepest parts of the slopes, was occupied by private houses (Tac. Hist. iii. 71; cf. Hist. Aug. Elag. 30). Remains of these houses have been found on the Arx near the church of S. Maria in Aracoeli, and at the foot of the stairway leading from the Piazza d'Aracoeli to the church (NS 1888, 497; 1889, 68; Mitt. 1889, 255; BC 1873, 111-122, 143-146; 1888, 331; see also Acciares
s of the republic, private dwellings were erected to some extent on the hill, for in the year 390 B.C. there was a guild of those who dwelt in Capitolio atque arce (Liv. v. 50); and after the treason of Manlius, a law was passed which forbade any patrician to live on either summit (Liv. vi. 20). In spite of such prohibitions, the gradual destruction of the fortifications and the demands of a rapidly increasing population led to continual encroachments upon this quasi- sacred hill. In 93 B.C. a considerable tract, which had belonged to the priests, was sold and came into private possession (Oros. v. 18; cf. also Cic. pro Mil. 64). By the middle of the first century the whole hill, with the exception of the area Capitolina, the actual sites of the temples, and the steepest parts of the slopes, was occupied by private houses (Tac. Hist. iii. 71; cf. Hist. Aug. Elag. 30). Remains of these houses have been found on the Arx near the church of S. Maria in Aracoeli, and at the