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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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e path to the depression, with the branch to the Capitolium, was made into a road suitable for vehicles, and henceforth known as the clivus Capitolinus (Liv. iii. 18. 7, 19. 7; Serv. Aen. ii. 116; viii. 319; Plin. NH xix. 23; Vell. ii. 3. 2). In 174 B.C. it was paved by the censors, Q. Fulvius Flaccus and A. Postumius Albinus, and a porticus was built on the right side of the road from the temple of Saturn to the Capitolium (Liv. xli. 27. 7; Tac. Hist. iii. 71). It is probable, however, that thives as a foundation for the clivus, but its upper course has been changed by more recent structures. Portions of the lava pavement of the clivus still exist at various points near the bottom of the ascent, including a small piece attributable to 174 B.C. and another attributable to Sulla; while that in front of the temple is one of the best specimens of Augustan paving in Rome, having been preserved by the erection upon it of the church of SS. Sergius and Bacchus (see SACRA VIA). Another piece
into a road suitable for vehicles, and henceforth known as the clivus Capitolinus (Liv. iii. 18. 7, 19. 7; Serv. Aen. ii. 116; viii. 319; Plin. NH xix. 23; Vell. ii. 3. 2). In 174 B.C. it was paved by the censors, Q. Fulvius Flaccus and A. Postumius Albinus, and a porticus was built on the right side of the road from the temple of Saturn to the Capitolium (Liv. xli. 27. 7; Tac. Hist. iii. 71). It is probable, however, that this porticus did not extend below the depression in later times. In 190 B.C. Scipio erected a decorative arch at the top of the clivus (Liv. xxxvii. 3). This was the only means of access to the mons Capitolinus except the flights of steps-Centum Gradus, Gradus Monetae (?)-and afforded a convenient place for commanding the forum with troops (Cic. pro Sest. 28; post red. 12 ; Phil. ii. 16, 19; ad Att. ii. I. 7). Along part of it, probably Inter duos Lucos, there were private houses (Cic. pro Mil. 64: domus in clivo Capitolino scutis referta). The clivus begins near th