hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
300 AD - 399 AD 90 90 Browse Search
1500 AD - 1599 AD 58 58 Browse Search
100 AD - 199 AD 31 31 Browse Search
500 AD - 599 AD 30 30 Browse Search
200 AD - 299 AD 24 24 Browse Search
179 BC 20 20 Browse Search
1400 AD - 1499 AD 19 19 Browse Search
400 AD - 499 AD 19 19 Browse Search
1100 AD - 1199 AD 17 17 Browse Search
700 AD - 799 AD 15 15 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

Found 2 total hits in 2 results.

sun-dials in Rome was on this temple, and it contained a wooden statue resembling that of Diana at Ephesus (Strabo iv. I. 5) brought to Rome from Marseilles, and another of marble (Plin. NH xxxvi. 32 : in magna admiratione est.... Hecate Ephesi in templo Dianae post aedem). In the Augustan period it contained a bronze stele on which was engraved the compact between Rome and the Latin cities, probably a copy of the original (Dionys. iv. 26), and another with the lex Icilia de Aventino publicando of 456 B.C. (Dionys. x. 32). It must also have contained a lex arae Dianae, which served as a model for other communities (CIL iii. 1933 ; xi. 361 ; xii. 4333), and probably other ancient documents. The date of the founding of this temple, and its real significance, have been the subject of much discussion (HJ 157-159; Gilb. ii. 236-241 ; RE v. 332-333 ; DE i. 177 ; ii. 1734-1737 ; and esp. Merlin 203-226, 282-283, 303-305 and literature there cited). Cf. also Beloch, Romische Geschichte, 192.
edem Dianae dedicaverit in Aventino cuius tutelae sint cervi). This temple was rebuilt by L. Cornificius during the reign of Augustus (Suct. Aug. 29). In this form it may be shown on coins (BM Rep. ii. 15. 4355=Aug. 643); and it is probably represented under the name aedes Dianae Cornificianae on a fragment (2) of the Marble Plan (BC 1891, 210-216; CIL vi. 4305: aedituus Dianae Cornif.), where it is drawn as octostyle and dipteral, surrounded by a double colonnade. It was standing in the fourth century (Not. Reg. XIII), but no trace of it has been found. According to Censorinus (loc. cit.) one of the oldest sun-dials in Rome was on this temple, and it contained a wooden statue resembling that of Diana at Ephesus (Strabo iv. I. 5) brought to Rome from Marseilles, and another of marble (Plin. NH xxxvi. 32 : in magna admiratione est.... Hecate Ephesi in templo Dianae post aedem). In the Augustan period it contained a bronze stele on which was engraved the compact between Rome and the Lat