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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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DIRIBITORIUM a building in the campus Martius in which the votes cast by the people, presumably in the Saepta, were counted by the diribitores, or election officials. It was begun by Agrippa, but opened and finished by Augustus in 7 B.C. (Cass. Dio lv. 8). Its roof had the widest span of any building erected in Rome before 230 A.D., and was supported by beams of larch one hundred feet long and one and a half feet thick, of which one that had not been needed was kept in the Saepta as a curiosity (Cass. Dio, loc. cit.; Plin. NH xvi. 201 ; xxxvi. 102). Caligula placed benches in the Diribitorium and used it instead of the theatre when the sun was particularly hot (Cass. Dio lix. 7), and from its roof Claudius watched a great fire in the Aemiliana (Suet. Claud. 18). Cassius Dio (lxvi. 24) states that this building was burned in the great fire of 80 A.D., but also (lv. 8) that in his day (early third century) it was standing unroofed (a)xanh)s), because, after its wonderful roof of grea
ams of larch one hundred feet long and one and a half feet thick, of which one that had not been needed was kept in the Saepta as a curiosity (Cass. Dio, loc. cit.; Plin. NH xvi. 201 ; xxxvi. 102). Caligula placed benches in the Diribitorium and used it instead of the theatre when the sun was particularly hot (Cass. Dio lix. 7), and from its roof Claudius watched a great fire in the Aemiliana (Suet. Claud. 18). Cassius Dio (lxvi. 24) states that this building was burned in the great fire of 80 A.D., but also (lv. 8) that in his day (early third century) it was standing unroofed (a)xanh)s), because, after its wonderful roof of great beams had been destroyed, it could not be rebuilt. As it is impossible that such a building in this locality should not have been repaired after the fire of 80, we must suppose that it was a hall without a roof for one hundred and fifty years. We must also suppose that it was very near the Saepta to facilitate the counting of votes, but it is very difficult
DIRIBITORIUM a building in the campus Martius in which the votes cast by the people, presumably in the Saepta, were counted by the diribitores, or election officials. It was begun by Agrippa, but opened and finished by Augustus in 7 B.C. (Cass. Dio lv. 8). Its roof had the widest span of any building erected in Rome before 230 A.D., and was supported by beams of larch one hundred feet long and one and a half feet thick, of which one that had not been needed was kept in the Saepta as a curiosity (Cass. Dio, loc. cit.; Plin. NH xvi. 201 ; xxxvi. 102). Caligula placed benches in the Diribitorium and used it instead of the theatre when the sun was particularly hot (Cass. Dio lix. 7), and from its roof Claudius watched a great fire in the Aemiliana (Suet. Claud. 18). Cassius Dio (lxvi. 24) states that this building was burned in the great fire of 80 A.D., but also (lv. 8) that in his day (early third century) it was standing unroofed (a)xanh)s), because, after its wonderful roof of grea
200 AD - 225 AD (search for this): entry diribitorium
half feet thick, of which one that had not been needed was kept in the Saepta as a curiosity (Cass. Dio, loc. cit.; Plin. NH xvi. 201 ; xxxvi. 102). Caligula placed benches in the Diribitorium and used it instead of the theatre when the sun was particularly hot (Cass. Dio lix. 7), and from its roof Claudius watched a great fire in the Aemiliana (Suet. Claud. 18). Cassius Dio (lxvi. 24) states that this building was burned in the great fire of 80 A.D., but also (lv. 8) that in his day (early third century) it was standing unroofed (a)xanh)s), because, after its wonderful roof of great beams had been destroyed, it could not be rebuilt. As it is impossible that such a building in this locality should not have been repaired after the fire of 80, we must suppose that it was a hall without a roof for one hundred and fifty years. We must also suppose that it was very near the Saepta to facilitate the counting of votes, but it is very difficult to find a location large enough for such a struc