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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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eliquo aere aedem Fortis Fortunae de manubiis faciendam locavit prope aedem eius deae ab rege Servio Tullio dedicatam). This was of course on the right bank of the river, but Carvilius' temple is mentioned nowhere else by name, nor is the day of its dedication known. It cannot be one of the two temples of the calendars, for they were five miles apart (vid. sup.), and there must, there- fore, have been three in existence in the time of Livy, to any one of which his notice of a prodigium in 2 B.C. may refer (xxvii. 11. 3: in cella [aedis] Fortis Fortunae). Finally in 17 A.D. Tiberius dedicated another temple to this goddess (Tac. Ann. ii. 41: fine anni.. aedes Fortis Fortunae Tiberim iuxta in hortis quos Caesar dictator populo Romano legaverat ... dicantur). As the Fasti Esquilini at any rate antedate 17 A.D., and as the day of dedication was near the end of the year, not 24th June, Tiberius' temple cannot be identified with either of the two temples of the calendars. If our sources
trans Tiber(im) ad milliar(ium) prim(um) et sext(um); Fast. Esq.: Fort(i) For(tunae) t(rans) T(iberim) ad mil(liarium) I et VI; CIL i². p. 243, 211, 320), which, however, mention two such temples, one at the first, and the other at the sixth, milestone on the via Portuensis, the latter close to the grove of the Arval Brethren. Here were found four dedications to Fors Fortuna (CIL i². 977-80=NS 1904, 366; CIL vi. 167-9; cf. BC 1904, 317-324). Both had the same festival day, 24th June. In 293 B.C. Sp. Carvilius let the contract for a temple of Fors Fortuna near that of Servius (Liv. x. 46. 14: reliquo aere aedem Fortis Fortunae de manubiis faciendam locavit prope aedem eius deae ab rege Servio Tullio dedicatam). This was of course on the right bank of the river, but Carvilius' temple is mentioned nowhere else by name, nor is the day of its dedication known. It cannot be one of the two temples of the calendars, for they were five miles apart (vid. sup.), and there must, there- fore
they were five miles apart (vid. sup.), and there must, there- fore, have been three in existence in the time of Livy, to any one of which his notice of a prodigium in 2 B.C. may refer (xxvii. 11. 3: in cella [aedis] Fortis Fortunae). Finally in 17 A.D. Tiberius dedicated another temple to this goddess (Tac. Ann. ii. 41: fine anni.. aedes Fortis Fortunae Tiberim iuxta in hortis quos Caesar dictator populo Romano legaverat ... dicantur). As the Fasti Esquilini at any rate antedate 17 A.D., and 17 A.D., and as the day of dedication was near the end of the year, not 24th June, Tiberius' temple cannot be identified with either of the two temples of the calendars. If our sources are so far correct, this made the fourth temple of this goddess in Trastevere. There are four later references to a temple of Fors Fortuna on the right bank of the Tiber: (I) Plutarch, Brut. 20 : kai\ tw=| dh/mw| tw=n [e/ran tou= potamou= kh/pwn a)poleleimme/nwn ou(= nu=n e)sti *tu/xhs i(ero\n ; (2) id. de Fort. Rom. 5:th\n d
een in the gardens. This fact may have caused confusion in later writers, and Plutarch's topographical statements are frequently unreliable. The theory that Carvilius' temple may have been replaced by that of Tiberius is not supported by the language of Tacitus. There seems, therefore, to be no escape from assuming the existence of three temples near the first milestone and the gardens of Caesar, unless there is error in the sources. One at least of these temples was in existence in the fourth century (Not.), and in this neighbourhood many small votive offerings in bronze have been found (NS 1888, 229; Mitt. 1889, 290-291). The ruins of a concrete podium faced with peperino, with architectural fragments, which were found in 1861, may perhaps belong to the temple of Servius (BC 1884, 26-27; Ann. d. Inst. 1860, 415-418). For the discussion of these temples, and further literature, see HJ 644-645; Becker, Top. 478-480; Rosch. i. 1501-1502; RE vii. 16-18; WR 256- 257; Pr. Reg. 216; CIL i