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Dio xlvii. 18). From the evidence of coins, A coin (Cohen, Aug. 122; BM. Rep. ii. p. 14, 4356-7; Aug. 63) which Hilsen (HC 61) refers to the curia, is thought to represent this temple by Mattingly (BM. p. cxxiii, n. 4) but without good reason. the temple was restored by Hadrian (Cohen, Hadrien 416-419, 1388), but the existing architectural fragments belong entirely to the original structure (Toeb. i. 5). It had the right of asylum (Cass. Dio xlvii. 19), and the Arval Brethren met there in 69 A.D. (Act. Arv. a. 69, Febr. 26, CIL vi. 2051, 55). A considerable part of the foundations, already uncovered (LS ii. 197), and the evidence of the coins of Hadrian, enabled Richter in 1889 to reconstruct the temple in its main lines (Jahr. d. Inst. 1889, 137-162; Ant. Denkmiler i. 27, 28), and additional information was given by the excavations of 1898-1899 (CR 1899, 185, 466; Mitt. 1902, 61-62; 1905, 75-76; BC 1903, 81-83; Atti 563-566). The temple consisted of two parts, a rectangular platfor
IULIUS, DIVUS, AEDES (delubrum, Pl.; h(rw=|on, Cass. Dio;new/s, App.): the temple of the deified Julius Caesar, authorised by the triumvirs in 42 B.C. (Cass. Dio xlvii. 18), but apparently built by Augustus alone (Mon. Anc. iv. 2: aedem divi Iuli ... feci), and dedicated 18th August, 29 B.C. (Cass. Dio li. 22; Hemerol. Amit. Antiat. ad xv Kal. Sept.). The body of Caesar was burnt at the east end of the forum, in front of the Regia (Liv. ep. 116; Plut. Caes. 68), and here an altar was at once erected (bwmo/s, App. BC i. 4; ii. 148; iii. 2), and a column of Numidian marble twenty feet high inscribed Parenti Patriae (Suet. Caes. 85). Column and altar were soon removed by Dolabella Cf. also Cass. Dio xliv. 50. Caesar's veterans had some idea of replacing the altar (Cic. ad Fam. xi. 2, veteranos de reponenda ara cogitare), which may be identical with the ' bustum ' of Cic. Phil. i. 5, though in Jord. i. 2. 407, it is interpreted as a cenotaph behind the altar. Cf. CR 1899, 186; and fo
IULIUS, DIVUS, AEDES (delubrum, Pl.; h(rw=|on, Cass. Dio;new/s, App.): the temple of the deified Julius Caesar, authorised by the triumvirs in 42 B.C. (Cass. Dio xlvii. 18), but apparently built by Augustus alone (Mon. Anc. iv. 2: aedem divi Iuli ... feci), and dedicated 18th August, 29 B.C. (Cass. Dio li. 22; Hemerol. Amit. Antiat. ad xv Kal. Sept.). The body of Caesar was burnt at the east end of the forum, in front of the Regia (Liv. ep. 116; Plut. Caes. 68), and here an altar was at once erected (bwmo/s, App. BC i. 4; ii. 148; iii. 2), and a column of Numidian marble twenty feet high inscribed Parenti Patriae (Suet. Caes. 85). Column and altar were soon removed by Dolabella Cf. also Cass. Dio xliv. 50. Caesar's veterans had some idea of replacing the altar (Cic. ad Fam. xi. 2, veteranos de reponenda ara cogitare), which may be identical with the ' bustum ' of Cic. Phil. i. 5, though in Jord. i. 2. 407, it is interpreted as a cenotaph behind the altar. Cf. CR 1899, 186; and fo