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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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IUNO SOSPITA, AEDES (1) (templum, Cicero): a temple vowed in 197 B.C. by the consul C. Cornelius Cethegus during the Insubrian war (Liv. xxxii. 30. 10), and dedicated in 194 Here it is referred to under the name Iuno Mlatuta: Sigonius reads 'sospitae.' Hiilsen says that it was dedicated four years later, i.e. in 93 : but the Latin is post quadrennium (AJP 1907, 328; WR cit. agrees). (Liv. xxxiv. 53. 3) on 1st February (Fast. Ant. ap. NS 1921, 86). It is said (Cic. de Div. i. 4. 99; Obseq. 75) that L. Julius, consul in 90 B.C., restored a temple of luno Sospita, in consequence of a dream of Caecilia, the daughter of Q. Caecilius Metellus Balearicus, and it is probable that it is this temple of Iuno Sospita in Rome that is meant rather than the more famous one at Lanuvium (HJ 509-510; Gilb. iii. 82, 430; WR 188; Rosch. ii. 596). It was in the forum Holitorium, and is generally identified with the smallest of the three temples (though Frank prefers the central one-TF 126-130) that li
um, Cicero): a temple vowed in 197 B.C. by the consul C. Cornelius Cethegus during the Insubrian war (Liv. xxxii. 30. 10), and dedicated in 194 Here it is referred to under the name Iuno Mlatuta: Sigonius reads 'sospitae.' Hiilsen says that it was dedicated four years later, i.e. in 93 : but the Latin is post quadrennium (AJP 1907, 328; WR cit. agrees). (Liv. xxxiv. 53. 3) on 1st February (Fast. Ant. ap. NS 1921, 86). It is said (Cic. de Div. i. 4. 99; Obseq. 75) that L. Julius, consul in 90 B.C., restored a temple of luno Sospita, in consequence of a dream of Caecilia, the daughter of Q. Caecilius Metellus Balearicus, and it is probable that it is this temple of Iuno Sospita in Rome that is meant rather than the more famous one at Lanuvium (HJ 509-510; Gilb. iii. 82, 430; WR 188; Rosch. ii. 596). It was in the forum Holitorium, and is generally identified with the smallest of the three temples (though Frank prefers the central one-TF 126-130) that lie side by side beneath the prese