hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
300 AD - 399 AD 90 90 Browse Search
1500 AD - 1599 AD 58 58 Browse Search
100 AD - 199 AD 31 31 Browse Search
500 AD - 599 AD 30 30 Browse Search
200 AD - 299 AD 24 24 Browse Search
179 BC 20 20 Browse Search
1400 AD - 1499 AD 19 19 Browse Search
400 AD - 499 AD 19 19 Browse Search
1100 AD - 1199 AD 17 17 Browse Search
700 AD - 799 AD 15 15 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

Found 3 total hits in 3 results.

t. 92; new/s, Dionys., Cass. Dio): a temple, said to have been the first in Rome, on the Capitoline hill, erected and dedicated by Romulus to commemorate his winning of the spolia opima from Acron, king of the Caeninenses, and to serve as a repository for them (Liv. i. 10. 5-6; iv. 20. 3; Plut. Rom. 16; Dionys. ii. 34; Val. Max. iii. 2. 3; Flor. i. I. ii; Serv. Aen. vi. 859; CIL ia. 283, Elog. 22=x. 809). Twice afterwards these spoils were said to have been won and placed in this temple-in 428 B.C. when A. Cornelius Cossus slew Lar Tolumnius, the king of Veii, and brought his spoils to Rome (Liv. iv. 20; Fest. 189; Plut. Rom. 16; Serv. Aen. vi. 859; Val. Max. iii. 2. 4; Diodor. xii. 80; Dionys. xii. 5; Flor. i. I . 9; de vir. ill. 25), and in 221 by C. Claudius Marcellus, who killed Viridomarus, the Insubrian king (Liv. Ep. 20; Serv. Aen. vi. 859; Prop. iv. 10. 45; Plut. Marc. 8; Rom. 16). This temple was probably within the later limits of the area Capitolina, and was said to have be
4206-8) struck by P. Cornelius Lentulus Marcellinus (RE iv. 1390) about 44 B.C., represents Marcellus, the conqueror of Viridomarus and Syracuse, standing on the high stylobate of a rectangular tetrastyle temple with the spolia opima in his hand. The columns support an entablature with plain pediment. This undoubtedly represents the actual structure before Augustus, but it had been sadly neglected and had even lost its roof. At the suggestion of Atticus, Augustus restored it, probably about 31 B.C. (Nep. Att. 20. 3:ex quo accidit, cum aedes Iovis Feretri in Capitolio ab Romulo constituta vetustate atque incuria detecta prolaberetur, ut Attici admonitu Caesar ear reficiendam curaret; Mon. Anc. iv. 5; Liv. iv. 20. 7). To Augustus it seems that the right of depositing spoils that should be regarded as spolia opima was then granted (Cass. Dio. xliv. 4. 3). Dionysius, writing almost certainly after Augustus' restoration, says (ii. 34):e)/ti ga\r au)tou= sw/|zetai to\ a)raxai=on I)/xnos, a
killed Viridomarus, the Insubrian king (Liv. Ep. 20; Serv. Aen. vi. 859; Prop. iv. 10. 45; Plut. Marc. 8; Rom. 16). This temple was probably within the later limits of the area Capitolina, and was said to have been enlarged by Ancus (Liv. i. 33. 8: amplificata), but was very small, for according to Dionysius (ii. 34) it measured not more than 15 feet on the longest sides. A denarius (Babelon, Claudia II; BM.Rep. i. 567, 4206-8) struck by P. Cornelius Lentulus Marcellinus (RE iv. 1390) about 44 B.C., represents Marcellus, the conqueror of Viridomarus and Syracuse, standing on the high stylobate of a rectangular tetrastyle temple with the spolia opima in his hand. The columns support an entablature with plain pediment. This undoubtedly represents the actual structure before Augustus, but it had been sadly neglected and had even lost its roof. At the suggestion of Atticus, Augustus restored it, probably about 31 B.C. (Nep. Att. 20. 3:ex quo accidit, cum aedes Iovis Feretri in Capitolio a