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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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tus in 10 B.C. and set up in the campus Martius between the ara Pacis Augustae and the columna Antonini Pii (CIL vi. 702; Amm. Marcell. xvii. 4. 12; Strabo xvii. 805 ; Plin. NH xxxvi. 71). It is of red granite, 21.79 metres high (cf. Plin. loc. cit.; Notit. Brev.: Jord. ii. 187), and covered with hieroglyphics (BC 1896, 273-283=Ob. Eg. 104-114). It was standing in the eighth century (Eins. 2. 5; 4. 3), but was thrown down and broken at some unknown date (BC 1917, 23), and not discovered until 1512 (PBS ii. 3). It was excavated in 1748, but, in spite of various attempts (LS iv. 151), it was not set up again in the Piazza di Montecitorio, its present site, until 1789 (BC 1914, 381). It was repaired with fragments from the columna Antonini. Augustus dedicated this obelisk to the Sun (CIL vi. 702) and made it the gnomon, or needle, of a great meridian The name 'ad Titan,' applied to the neighbouring church of S. Lorenzo in Lucina in liturgies of the eighth-tenth centuries, which originate
OBELISCUS AUGUSTI, GNOMON an obelisk erected at Heliopolis in the seventh century B.C. by Psammetichus II, brought to Rome by Augustus in 10 B.C. and set up in the campus Martius between the ara Pacis Augustae and the columna Antonini Pii (CIL vi. 702; Amm. Marcell. xvii. 4. 12; Strabo xvii. 805 ; Plin. NH xxxvi. 71). It is of red granite, 21.79 metres high (cf. Plin. loc. cit.; Notit. Brev.: Jord. ii. 187), and covered with hieroglyphics (BC 1896, 273-283=Ob. Eg. 104-114). It was standing in the eighth century (Eins. 2. 5; 4. 3), but was thrown down and broken at some unknown date (BC 1917, 23), and not discovered until 1512 (PBS ii. 3). It was excavated in 1748, but, in spite of various attempts (LS iv. 151), it was not set up again in the Piazza di Montecitorio, its present site, until 1789 (BC 1914, 381). It was repaired with fragments from the columna Antonini. Augustus dedicated this obelisk to the Sun (CIL vi. 702) and made it the gnomon, or needle, of a great meridian The
OBELISCUS AUGUSTI, GNOMON an obelisk erected at Heliopolis in the seventh century B.C. by Psammetichus II, brought to Rome by Augustus in 10 B.C. and set up in the campus Martius between the ara Pacis Augustae and the columna Antonini Pii (CIL vi. 702; Amm. Marcell. xvii. 4. 12; Strabo xvii. 805 ; Plin. NH xxxvi. 71). It is of red granite, 21.79 metres high (cf. Plin. loc. cit.; Notit. Brev.: Jord. ii. 187), and covered with hieroglyphics (BC 1896, 273-283=Ob. Eg. 104-114). It was standing in the eighth century (Eins. 2. 5; 4. 3), but was thrown down and broken at some unknown date (BC 1917, 23), and not discovered until 1512 (PBS ii. 3). It was excavated in 1748, but, in spite of various attempts (LS iv. 151), it was not set up again in the Piazza di Montecitorio, its present site, until 1789 (BC 1914, 381). It was repaired with fragments from the columna Antonini. Augustus dedicated this obelisk to the Sun (CIL vi. 702) and made it the gnomon, or needle, of a great meridian The
UGUSTI, GNOMON an obelisk erected at Heliopolis in the seventh century B.C. by Psammetichus II, brought to Rome by Augustus in 10 B.C. and set up in the campus Martius between the ara Pacis Augustae and the columna Antonini Pii (CIL vi. 702; Amm. Marcell. xvii. 4. 12; Strabo xvii. 805 ; Plin. NH xxxvi. 71). It is of red granite, 21.79 metres high (cf. Plin. loc. cit.; Notit. Brev.: Jord. ii. 187), and covered with hieroglyphics (BC 1896, 273-283=Ob. Eg. 104-114). It was standing in the eighth century (Eins. 2. 5; 4. 3), but was thrown down and broken at some unknown date (BC 1917, 23), and not discovered until 1512 (PBS ii. 3). It was excavated in 1748, but, in spite of various attempts (LS iv. 151), it was not set up again in the Piazza di Montecitorio, its present site, until 1789 (BC 1914, 381). It was repaired with fragments from the columna Antonini. Augustus dedicated this obelisk to the Sun (CIL vi. 702) and made it the gnomon, or needle, of a great meridian The name 'ad Tita