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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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pi/tomon o(do/n, from which street the temple was probably reached by the scalae deum Penatium mentioned by Varro (ap. Donat. loc. cit.). There is no record of its building, but it is first mentioned in the list of Argei (Varro v. 54:Veliense sexticeps in Velia apud aedem deum Penatium) of the second half of the third century B.C. Dionysius (loc. cit.) describes it asu(peroxh=| skoteivo\s i(drume/nos ou) me/gas, and its foundation was probably a little earlier than the first Punic war. In 167 B.C. it was struck by lightning (Liv. xlv. 16. 5), and in 165 the opening of its doors at night was listed among the prodigia (Obseq. 13). It was restored by Augustus (Mon. Anc. iv. 7; cf. vi. 33). In it were archaic statues of the Dioscuri as dei Penates See Wissowa, Ges. Abh. 96-99, who supposes that Dionysius actually saw the inscription on the base. (Dionys. loc. cit.), an identification that is further supported by the evidence of coins of M'. Fonteius, about 104 B.C. (Babelon, Monnaies i
first Punic war. In 167 B.C. it was struck by lightning (Liv. xlv. 16. 5), and in 165 the opening of its doors at night was listed among the prodigia (Obseq. 13). It was restored by Augustus (Mon. Anc. iv. 7; cf. vi. 33). In it were archaic statues of the Dioscuri as dei Penates See Wissowa, Ges. Abh. 96-99, who supposes that Dionysius actually saw the inscription on the base. (Dionys. loc. cit.), an identification that is further supported by the evidence of coins of M'. Fonteius, about 104 B.C. (Babelon, Monnaies i. 503, No. 8), BM. Rep. i. 195. 1230; 202. 1314-1326; 522. 4032. C. Sulpicius, about 94 (ib. ii. 471, No. 1), and C. Antius Restio 49-45 (i. 155, No. 2). A temple of the Penates seems also to be represented on one of the reliefs of the ara Pacis Augustae (OJ x. 1907, 186-188; SScR 25). This temple is sometimes thought to have been removed by Vespasian when he built the forum Pacis (see PACIS TEMPLUM), sometimes to have occupied the site of the so-called ' templum Romul
2; Donat. ad Ter. Eun. 256). This was not far from the forum, on a short street leading to the Carinae (Dionys. i. 68. 1:new\s a)gora=s ou) pro/sw kata\ th\n e)pi *kari/nas fe/rousan e)pi/tomon o(do/n, from which street the temple was probably reached by the scalae deum Penatium mentioned by Varro (ap. Donat. loc. cit.). There is no record of its building, but it is first mentioned in the list of Argei (Varro v. 54:Veliense sexticeps in Velia apud aedem deum Penatium) of the second half of the third century B.C. Dionysius (loc. cit.) describes it asu(peroxh=| skoteivo\s i(drume/nos ou) me/gas, and its foundation was probably a little earlier than the first Punic war. In 167 B.C. it was struck by lightning (Liv. xlv. 16. 5), and in 165 the opening of its doors at night was listed among the prodigia (Obseq. 13). It was restored by Augustus (Mon. Anc. iv. 7; cf. vi. 33). In it were archaic statues of the Dioscuri as dei Penates See Wissowa, Ges. Abh. 96-99, who supposes that Dionysius