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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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PORTICUS LIVIAE begun by Augustus on the site of the house of VEDIUS POLLIO (q.v.) in 15 B.C., and finished and dedicated to Livia in 7 B.C. (Cass. Dio liv. 23; lv. 8; In ib. Ivi. 27. 5 Atovla has been emended into )*iouli/a, as the date there given is 12 A.D.(See BASILICA IULIA, BASILICA AEMILIA.) Suet. Aug. 29; Ov. Fast. vi. 639). It is represented on three fragments of the Marble Plan (10, 11, 109), and was situated on the north slope of the Oppius on the south side of the clivus Suburanus, between this street and the later baths of Trajan. The porticus was rectangular, about 115 metres long and 75 wide, with an outer wall and double row of columns within. In each of the long sides were three niches, the central one square, the others semi-circular. There was also a semi-circular apse on the south side. The entrance was on the north, where a flight of steps, 20 metres wide, led down to the clivus Suburanus. In the centre of the area was something that appears to have been a fo
PORTICUS LIVIAE begun by Augustus on the site of the house of VEDIUS POLLIO (q.v.) in 15 B.C., and finished and dedicated to Livia in 7 B.C. (Cass. Dio liv. 23; lv. 8; In ib. Ivi. 27. 5 Atovla has been emended into )*iouli/a, as the date there given is 12 A.D.(See BASILICA IULIA, BASILICA AEMILIA.) Suet. Aug. 29; Ov. Fast. vi. 639). It is represented on three fragments of the Marble Plan (10, 11, 109), and was situated on the north slope of the Oppius on the south side of the clivus Suburanus, between this street and the later baths of Trajan. The porticus was rectangular, about 115 metres long and 75 wide, with an outer wall and double row of columns within. In each of the long sides were three niches, the central one square, the others semi-circular. There was also a semi-circular apse on the south side. The entrance was on the north, where a flight of steps, 20 metres wide, led down to the clivus Suburanus. In the centre of the area was something that appears to have been a fo
PORTICUS LIVIAE begun by Augustus on the site of the house of VEDIUS POLLIO (q.v.) in 15 B.C., and finished and dedicated to Livia in 7 B.C. (Cass. Dio liv. 23; lv. 8; In ib. Ivi. 27. 5 Atovla has been emended into )*iouli/a, as the date there given is 12 A.D.(See BASILICA IULIA, BASILICA AEMILIA.) Suet. Aug. 29; Ov. Fast. vi. 639). It is represented on three fragments of the Marble Plan (10, 11, 109), and was situated on the north slope of the Oppius on the south side of the clivus Suburanus, between this street and the later baths of Trajan. The porticus was rectangular, about 115 metres long and 75 wide, with an outer wall and double row of columns within. In each of the long sides were three niches, the central one square, the others semi-circular. There was also a semi-circular apse on the south side. The entrance was on the north, where a flight of steps, 20 metres wide, led down to the clivus Suburanus. In the centre of the area was something that appears to have been a fou