hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
300 AD - 399 AD 90 90 Browse Search
1500 AD - 1599 AD 58 58 Browse Search
100 AD - 199 AD 31 31 Browse Search
500 AD - 599 AD 30 30 Browse Search
200 AD - 299 AD 24 24 Browse Search
179 BC 20 20 Browse Search
1400 AD - 1499 AD 19 19 Browse Search
400 AD - 499 AD 19 19 Browse Search
1100 AD - 1199 AD 17 17 Browse Search
700 AD - 799 AD 15 15 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

Found 5 total hits in 4 results.

PORTICUS MINUCIA built by M. Minucius Rufus, consul in 110 B.C. (Veil. ii. 8. 3: per eadem tempora clarus eius Minuci qui porticusi quae hodieque celebres sunt, molitus est, ex Scordiscis triumphus fuit). This use of the plural is no evidence that the porticus was double, or that there were two buildings, for Velleius uses it elsewhere of a single porticus (ii. I. 2), as do other writers (e.g. Plin. NH xxxv. 14). In it Antonius, and probably other officials, set up their tribunals (Cic. Phil. ii. 84: in porticu Minucia), and it is mentioned in Apuleius (de mundo 35: alius ad Minuciam frumentatum venit) and in the Historia Augusta (Commod. 16: Herculis signum aeneum sudavit in Minucia per plures dies). In the calendars it occurs twice (Praen. ad xi Kal. Ian., CIL is. p. 238: laribus permarinis in porticu Minucia; Filoc. ad prid. Non. Iun., CIL i. p. 266: ludi in Minicia; cf. p. 338), and in several inscriptions of the first four centuries (see below), but always alone and in the si
d there are traces of a second row of columns and a wall behind. Drawings of the sixteenth century show that this colonnade had an upper story, with columns standing on the centre of the arches below. There are also blocks of travertine pavement (NS 1891, 336; 1892, 265; Mitt. 1892, 321 ; 1893, 318; this view of HUlsen's is expressed on his map of 1912). Hfilsen is further inclined to derive the name of S. Maria de Publico (so called in a bull of 1186 and generally till the end of the fifteenth century), now known as S. Maria in Publicolis, This form only came in during the sixteenth century when the Santacroce family traced their pedigree back to the Valerii Publicolae. from the frumentum publicum distributed here (HCh 361; BC 1927, 94-100). Another theory (Canina, Edif. ii. pl. 149; LR 513; LF 28; Delbriick, Die drei Tempel am Forum Holitorium, Rome 1903, I) is that the porticus lay between the foot of the Capitol and the theatre of Marcellus, thus identifying the two buildings
o Servius Tullius preserved in the Chronograph (p. 144: hic votum fecit ut quotquot annos regnasset tot ostia ad frumentum publicum constitueret), and a lead tessera (Rostowzew, Sylloge No. 336; Klio, Suppl. iii. 21-22) with Minucia on the reverse side, show that the porticus Minucia was divided into 45 ostia or sections, in which definite groups of people received their doles in definite days in the month. The officials of this department are mentioned in three other inscriptions of the second century (CIL xi. 5669: proc. Aug. ad Minuciam; vi. 1648: proc. Mini(ciae); iii. 249: proc. Min(uciae) ), and perhaps in two more (vi. 1408: cur. Min(uciae); xi. 4182: prae(fectus ?) Minicia). Beginning with the time of Severus the name of the porticus appears in inscriptions of officials of the water department (v. 7783: curator aquarum et Minuciae; vi. 1532: cur. aquar. et Miniciae; x. 4752:consulari aquarum et Minuciae; xiv. 3902: curator aquarum et Miniciae; NS 19O1, 129-131; cf. Mommsen, St
(Sangallo,p.9,47). In the Via dei Calderari, No. 23, two travertine pilasters with engaged columns and the entablature are built into the front of the house, and there are traces of a second row of columns and a wall behind. Drawings of the sixteenth century show that this colonnade had an upper story, with columns standing on the centre of the arches below. There are also blocks of travertine pavement (NS 1891, 336; 1892, 265; Mitt. 1892, 321 ; 1893, 318; this view of HUlsen's is expressed onis map of 1912). Hfilsen is further inclined to derive the name of S. Maria de Publico (so called in a bull of 1186 and generally till the end of the fifteenth century), now known as S. Maria in Publicolis, This form only came in during the sixteenth century when the Santacroce family traced their pedigree back to the Valerii Publicolae. from the frumentum publicum distributed here (HCh 361; BC 1927, 94-100). Another theory (Canina, Edif. ii. pl. 149; LR 513; LF 28; Delbriick, Die drei Tempel