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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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PORTICUS OCTAVIA built by Cn. Octavius in 168 B.C. to commemorate a naval victory over Perseus of Macedonia (Fest. 178; Veil. ii. I). It stood between the theatre of Pompeius and the circus Flaminius, and was also called porticus Corinthia from its bronze Corinthian capitals (Plin. NH xxxiv. 13), perhaps the earliest instance of the use of this order in Rome (for a possible identification with remains in the Via S. Nicola ai Cesarini, and representation in the Marble Plan (frg. 140), see BC 1918, 151-155). Augustus restored the building in 33 B.C. (Mon. Anc. iv. 3), and placed within it the standards which he had taken from the Dalmatians (App. Illyr. 28: Cass. Dio xlix. 43, where there is confusion between this and the porticus Octaviae). It was called multo amoenissima (Vell. loc. cit.), but has left no traces (HJ 488-489; AR 1909, 77).
PORTICUS OCTAVIA built by Cn. Octavius in 168 B.C. to commemorate a naval victory over Perseus of Macedonia (Fest. 178; Veil. ii. I). It stood between the theatre of Pompeius and the circus Flaminius, and was also called porticus Corinthia from its bronze Corinthian capitals (Plin. NH xxxiv. 13), perhaps the earliest instance of the use of this order in Rome (for a possible identification with remains in the Via S. Nicola ai Cesarini, and representation in the Marble Plan (frg. 140), see BC 1918, 151-155). Augustus restored the building in 33 B.C. (Mon. Anc. iv. 3), and placed within it the standards which he had taken from the Dalmatians (App. Illyr. 28: Cass. Dio xlix. 43, where there is confusion between this and the porticus Octaviae). It was called multo amoenissima (Vell. loc. cit.), but has left no traces (HJ 488-489; AR 1909, 77).