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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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leg. i. 2. 6 ; Gell. ii. 28. 6; Dionys. i. 76. 3), and it was the place of assembly of the college of pontiffs (Plin. Ep. iv. II. 6; Cic. ad Att. x. 3 a, I; WR 503), and at times of the Fratres Arvales (CIL vi. 2023. 9). ATRIUM REGIUM (q.v.) is referred to the regia by Jord. i. 2. 380, and Toeb. 3. The regia was burned and restored in 148 B.C. (Obseq. 19; Liv. epit. Oxyrh. 127-129; Gilb. iii. 407 (for a possible burning by the Gauls in 390 B.C., see Mem. Am. Acad. ii. 59-60)); and again in 36 B.C., when the restoration was carried out by Cn. Domitius Calvinus who created a building, small but of unusual beauty (Cass. Dio xlviii. 42; cf. Plin. NH xxxiv. 48; CIL vi. 1301 ; EE iii. 266). The evidence of the ruins shows that the statement of Tacitus (Ann. xv. 41) that the regia was destroyed in the fire of Nero is greatly exaggerated (for possible injury by the great fire in Commodus' reign, see Herodian i. 14. 3). The building is represented on a fragment of the Marble Plan (21), and is
Arvales (CIL vi. 2023. 9). ATRIUM REGIUM (q.v.) is referred to the regia by Jord. i. 2. 380, and Toeb. 3. The regia was burned and restored in 148 B.C. (Obseq. 19; Liv. epit. Oxyrh. 127-129; Gilb. iii. 407 (for a possible burning by the Gauls in 390 B.C., see Mem. Am. Acad. ii. 59-60)); and again in 36 B.C., when the restoration was carried out by Cn. Domitius Calvinus who created a building, small but of unusual beauty (Cass. Dio xlviii. 42; cf. Plin. NH xxxiv. 48; CIL vi. 1301 ; EE iii. 266). epublican remains are found only in the foundations of the imperial structure, the ground plan of which is practically identical. There are traces of the repairs of 148, while the walls of cappellaccio probably date from well before the fire of 390 B.C. After the restoration of Calvinus the regia was shaped like an irregular pentagon, filling the space between the Sacra via, the temenos of Vesta, and the temple of Julius Caesar, and consisting of parts unsymmetrically joined together. The princ
ves of the pontifices were probably kept here, for the tablets from which the annales maximi were edited, were hung on the outer wall of the building (Cic. de leg. i. 2. 6 ; Gell. ii. 28. 6; Dionys. i. 76. 3), and it was the place of assembly of the college of pontiffs (Plin. Ep. iv. II. 6; Cic. ad Att. x. 3 a, I; WR 503), and at times of the Fratres Arvales (CIL vi. 2023. 9). ATRIUM REGIUM (q.v.) is referred to the regia by Jord. i. 2. 380, and Toeb. 3. The regia was burned and restored in 148 B.C. (Obseq. 19; Liv. epit. Oxyrh. 127-129; Gilb. iii. 407 (for a possible burning by the Gauls in 390 B.C., see Mem. Am. Acad. ii. 59-60)); and again in 36 B.C., when the restoration was carried out by Cn. Domitius Calvinus who created a building, small but of unusual beauty (Cass. Dio xlviii. 42; cf. Plin. NH xxxiv. 48; CIL vi. 1301 ; EE iii. 266). The evidence of the ruins shows that the statement of Tacitus (Ann. xv. 41) that the regia was destroyed in the fire of Nero is greatly exaggerated
199 BC - 100 BC (search for this): entry regia
rth and south, of the area of the regia was about 27 metres, and the least about 12 metres. The court was paved with slabs of marble, and in it are two wells and a cistern, which may date from a very early time, though Frank assigns the greater age to the main (trapezoidal) building, and contained fragments of various kinds. Near the cistern is a base of tufa blocks, with traces of a circular superstructure. To this may belong the round block of peperino with the inscription A. COVRI (second century B.C.). A fragment of a puteal was also found, bearing the name REGIA (CIL ij. 1007, 1008). At the south-west end of the marble building is a small room, and near this in the wall was found the inscription (NS 1899, 128) of the SCHOLA KALATORUM (q.v.), but no identification of any of the existing divisions of the ruins with any of the parts of the ancient regia mentioned in classical literature is possible. In the seventh or eighth century the regia was transformed into a private house, t
600 AD - 699 AD (search for this): entry regia
ng the round block of peperino with the inscription A. COVRI (second century B.C.). A fragment of a puteal was also found, bearing the name REGIA (CIL ij. 1007, 1008). At the south-west end of the marble building is a small room, and near this in the wall was found the inscription (NS 1899, 128) of the SCHOLA KALATORUM (q.v.), but no identification of any of the existing divisions of the ruins with any of the parts of the ancient regia mentioned in classical literature is possible. In the seventh or eighth century the regia was transformed into a private house, the traces of which are visible in all parts of the area, but especially along the Sacra via, where the house was approached by a flight of two steps roughly made of marble and travertine, on which stood a row of cipollino columns taken from some ancient building. Literature: general-Jord. i. 2. 298-304, 423-429; Gilb. i. 225-227, 305-310, 341-352; iii. 407-410; Thedenat 91-94, 274-277; HC 180-185; RE i. A. 465-469; WR 502;
200 AD - 299 AD (search for this): entry regia
n was carried out by Cn. Domitius Calvinus who created a building, small but of unusual beauty (Cass. Dio xlviii. 42; cf. Plin. NH xxxiv. 48; CIL vi. 1301 ; EE iii. 266). The evidence of the ruins shows that the statement of Tacitus (Ann. xv. 41) that the regia was destroyed in the fire of Nero is greatly exaggerated (for possible injury by the great fire in Commodus' reign, see Herodian i. 14. 3). The building is represented on a fragment of the Marble Plan (21), and is mentioned in the third century (Solin. loc. cit.) and probably in the fourth (CIL vi. 511). The existing ruins belong to three periods, the republican, the early imperial and the mediaeval. Of the superstructure of the first two periods almost nothing remains except the lowest courses of some of the walls and many architectural fragments. The republican remains are found only in the foundations of the imperial structure, the ground plan of which is practically identical. There are traces of the repairs of 148, whil
700 AD - 799 AD (search for this): entry regia
lock of peperino with the inscription A. COVRI (second century B.C.). A fragment of a puteal was also found, bearing the name REGIA (CIL ij. 1007, 1008). At the south-west end of the marble building is a small room, and near this in the wall was found the inscription (NS 1899, 128) of the SCHOLA KALATORUM (q.v.), but no identification of any of the existing divisions of the ruins with any of the parts of the ancient regia mentioned in classical literature is possible. In the seventh or eighth century the regia was transformed into a private house, the traces of which are visible in all parts of the area, but especially along the Sacra via, where the house was approached by a flight of two steps roughly made of marble and travertine, on which stood a row of cipollino columns taken from some ancient building. Literature: general-Jord. i. 2. 298-304, 423-429; Gilb. i. 225-227, 305-310, 341-352; iii. 407-410; Thedenat 91-94, 274-277; HC 180-185; RE i. A. 465-469; WR 502; LR 221-223; RL
399 BC - 300 BC (search for this): entry regia
le. In the seventh or eighth century the regia was transformed into a private house, the traces of which are visible in all parts of the area, but especially along the Sacra via, where the house was approached by a flight of two steps roughly made of marble and travertine, on which stood a row of cipollino columns taken from some ancient building. Literature: general-Jord. i. 2. 298-304, 423-429; Gilb. i. 225-227, 305-310, 341-352; iii. 407-410; Thedenat 91-94, 274-277; HC 180-185; RE i. A. 465-469; WR 502; LR 221-223; RL xix. 1910, 201-216, where Pais argues that the regia and Vesta cult were not established in the forum until the fourth century B.C.; for recent excavations-Mitt. 1886, 94-98, 99-111; 1902, 62-66; 1905, 77-80; 1921, 17-23; Archaeologia, 1887, 227-250; Jahrb. d. Inst. 1889, 228-253; NS 1899,220-223,384-386, 486-488; BC 1899, 205-213; 1903, 42-55; 1920, 152-162; CR 1899, 322, 466; 1901, 139; AA 90000, 6-8; Atti 518-525; Toeb. 1-12; TF 81-85; DR 249-274; HFP 36, 37.