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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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ound as to successive extensions of the POMERIUM (q.v.) under Claudius, Vespasian and Hadrian; (2) Pliny's description (NH iii. 66-67) of the area of the city in his day-a passage full of difficulty and uncertainty; (3) the customs boundary of the city, marked by cippi, of which five have been found, dating from the time of Commodus (CIL vi. 1016 a, b, c, 8594, 31227) Four of them are marked ABCD in text fig. 4 (p. 394). ; (4) the list of vici on the so-called Capitoline Base, inscribed in 136 A.D. (CIL vi. 975; Jord. ii. 585-598). The line of the Servian wall was not always a boundary between adjacent regions, for while III, IV, VIII, XI appear to have always been limited by that line on the inside, and the same was true of V, VII, IX on the outside, I, II, VI, XII, XIII embraced ground on both sides. Nor did the wall of Aurelian and the Augustan or later outer boundaries everywhere coincide. The following short description of the regions is based on the latest and most generally acc
REGIONES QUATTUORDECIM * the fourteen regions, or wards, into which Augustus divided the city when he reformed the municipal administration in 7 B.C. (Suet. Aug. 30; Cass. Dio Iv. 8). Thereafter Rome was often designated as urbs regionum xiv or urbs sacra regionum xiv (text fig. 4). These regions were divided into vici, and a new set of magistrates, magistri vicorum, drawn from the common citizens, was instituted, originally four from each vicus, but afterwards forty-eight from each region regardless of the number of vici, and two curatores. These magistrates had to do mainly with the religious ceremonies of the regions, while the regular municipal administration was still in the hands of higher officials. (For the administrative organisation of the regions, see Marquardt, Staatsverwaltung iii. 203-207; Mommsen, Staatsrecht ii. 1035- 1037; iii. 119-122; BC 1906, 198-208; CIL vi. 975.) The regions were fourteen in number, twice as many as the traditional hills of Rome, and were k
were taken, and then were placed by careless editing at the head of the list of buildings in each region. It is further to be noted that, even when they are those of buildings, they are not repeated in these lists. (cf. REGIO-PALATII, REGIO CAMPI MARTII, Suet. Caes. 39, Aug. 5, Nero 12, de gramm. 2; and TEMPLUM PACIS for Region IV, which could not have been used at all until after that building was erected by Vespasian.) This division into fourteen regions continued in force until the seventh century when an ecclesiastical division into seven regions was introduced and opened the way for the entirely different organisation of the Middle Ages. From the Regionary Catalogue it is possible to determine with some precision, in most cases, the limits of these regions in the fourth century, but it is a different matter to do this for the Augustan division, inasmuch as it is certain that the outer boundaries at least had been extended at some points during the intervening three hundred year
ganisation of the Middle Ages. From the Regionary Catalogue it is possible to determine with some precision, in most cases, the limits of these regions in the fourth century, but it is a different matter to do this for the Augustan division, inasmuch as it is certain that the outer boundaries at least had been extended at some poid in Region V until after the time of Vespasian. The boundary was about 300-400 metres beyond the Aurelian wall on the south (Mitt. 1896, 122-130), but in the fourth century coincided with it from a point south of the via Labicana to the south side of the castra Praetoria. VI, Alta Semita, so called from a street that followed thee porta Viminalis and the porta Collina, and extended far enough west to take in the horti Sallustiani, and north beyond the line of the Aurelian wall. In the fourth century, after the castra Praetoria had been made a part of the city, the boundary of this region coincided with the Aurelian wall from the porta Salaria south round