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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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35-239). As we have seen, the site of the AREA PALATINA (q.v.) has been generally connected with that of Roma quadrata (2); but inasmuch as the latter is stated by Festus to be ante templum Apollinis, it is difficult to find a place for it if we accept (as on other grounds we are probably right in doing) the theory of Pinza and Richmond as to the latter. Richmond's attempt to locate the area in front of the temple, and Lugli's placing of it to one side (ZA 175-176) do not seem successful. It may indeed be better to accept Reid's and Leopold's idea ' that the name Roma quadrata, as restricted to the mundus, is a purely antiquarian invention' (YW 1914, 12-13) founded only on Plutarch. During the ludi saeculares of 204 A.D. a tribunal was erected 'ad Romam quadratam' for the distribution of suffimenta (incense); see CIL vi. 32327. As another was erected in area Apollinis, it is probable that Roma quadrata was at a little distance from it (HJ 43). See the references on ROMA QUADRATA (1).
Claudius, which have been connected, not unnaturally, with the site of Roma quadrata, were also found between the summa Sacra via and the mediaeval ruins which were formerly believed to belong to the temple of Jupiter Stator, but have since been excavated by Boni, and ascertained to be the foundations of two towers, which he conjectures to be the Turres Cencii, domnae Bonae et Unquitatis (Iniquitatis ? in which Pope Gelasius II was imprisoned in 1118), which were demolished by Calixtus II in 1119 (LPD ii. 323, 324, n. 18). The foundations of a triumphal arch also came to light (see ARCUS DOMITIANI (2)). A statue of the fifth-fourth century B.C. (perhaps of the school of Timotheus) which has generally been interpreted as a Victory, was also found here (AJA 1918, 347); but the lack of wings is against the identification (DAP 2. xiv. 235-239). As we have seen, the site of the AREA PALATINA (q.v.) has been generally connected with that of Roma quadrata (2); but inasmuch as the latter is s
diaeval ruins which were formerly believed to belong to the temple of Jupiter Stator, but have since been excavated by Boni, and ascertained to be the foundations of two towers, which he conjectures to be the Turres Cencii, domnae Bonae et Unquitatis (Iniquitatis ? in which Pope Gelasius II was imprisoned in 1118), which were demolished by Calixtus II in 1119 (LPD ii. 323, 324, n. 18). The foundations of a triumphal arch also came to light (see ARCUS DOMITIANI (2)). A statue of the fifth-fourth century B.C. (perhaps of the school of Timotheus) which has generally been interpreted as a Victory, was also found here (AJA 1918, 347); but the lack of wings is against the identification (DAP 2. xiv. 235-239). As we have seen, the site of the AREA PALATINA (q.v.) has been generally connected with that of Roma quadrata (2); but inasmuch as the latter is stated by Festus to be ante templum Apollinis, it is difficult to find a place for it if we accept (as on other grounds we are probably right