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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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nate as distinguished from the fiscus of the emperors, and was administered by praefecti generally instead of quaestors (Plin. Ep. x. 3. 1; for the inscriptions relating to the aerarium, see DE i. 300; and for occurrences of aerarium populi romani or Saturni, Thes. ling. Lat. i. 1055-1058). It is probable that only the money itself was kept in the temple, and that the offices of the treasury adjoined it, perhaps at the rear in the AREA SATURNI (q.v.), until the building of the Tabularium in 78 B.C., when some at least of the records were probably transferred thither. Other public documents were affixed to the outer walls of the temple and adjacent columns (Cass. Dio xlv. 17. 3; CIL ia. 587, col. 2, 1. 40; Varro, LL v. 42). On the gable of the temple were statues of Tritons with horses (Macrob. i. 8. 4), and in the cella was a statue of Saturn, filled with oil and bound in wool (Plin. NH xv. 32; Macrob. i. 8. 5; Rosch. iv. 431), which was carried in triumphal processions (Dionys. vii.
vii. 316, 354-356; Peter, Hist. Rom. Reliq. is. 155), and this form of the tradition is probably valueless. It is, however, preferred by Beloch, Rem. Gesch. 12, 13. The dedication of the temple may safely be assigned to the beginning of the republic. In 174 B.C. a porticus was built along the clivus Capitolinus from the temple to the Capitolium (Liv. xli. 27. 7). In 42 B.C. the temple was rebuilt by L. Munatius Plancus (Suet. Aug. 29; CIL vi. 1316; x. 6087). It is mentioned incidentally in 16 A.D. (Tac. Ann. ii. 41), and at some time in the fourth century it was injured by fire and restored by vote of the senate, as recorded in the inscription on the architrave (CIL vi. 937). It is represented on three fragments of the Marble Plan (22, 23, 30), and is mentioned in Reg. (Not. Reg. VIII). Throughout the republic this temple contained the state treasury, the aerarium populi Romani or Saturni, in charge of the quaestors (Fest. 2; Solin. i. 12; Macrob. i. 8. 3; Plut. Tib. Gracchus 10; Ap
different tradition seems to be preserved by Gellius (ap. Macrob. i. 8. I: nec me fugit Gellium scribere senatum decresse ut aedes Saturni fieret eique rei L. Furium tribunum militum praefuisse). Which Furius is referred to is not known (RE vii. 316, 354-356; Peter, Hist. Rom. Reliq. is. 155), and this form of the tradition is probably valueless. It is, however, preferred by Beloch, Rem. Gesch. 12, 13. The dedication of the temple may safely be assigned to the beginning of the republic. In 174 B.C. a porticus was built along the clivus Capitolinus from the temple to the Capitolium (Liv. xli. 27. 7). In 42 B.C. the temple was rebuilt by L. Munatius Plancus (Suet. Aug. 29; CIL vi. 1316; x. 6087). It is mentioned incidentally in 16 A.D. (Tac. Ann. ii. 41), and at some time in the fourth century it was injured by fire and restored by vote of the senate, as recorded in the inscription on the architrave (CIL vi. 937). It is represented on three fragments of the Marble Plan (22, 23, 30), an
resse ut aedes Saturni fieret eique rei L. Furium tribunum militum praefuisse). Which Furius is referred to is not known (RE vii. 316, 354-356; Peter, Hist. Rom. Reliq. is. 155), and this form of the tradition is probably valueless. It is, however, preferred by Beloch, Rem. Gesch. 12, 13. The dedication of the temple may safely be assigned to the beginning of the republic. In 174 B.C. a porticus was built along the clivus Capitolinus from the temple to the Capitolium (Liv. xli. 27. 7). In 42 B.C. the temple was rebuilt by L. Munatius Plancus (Suet. Aug. 29; CIL vi. 1316; x. 6087). It is mentioned incidentally in 16 A.D. (Tac. Ann. ii. 41), and at some time in the fourth century it was injured by fire and restored by vote of the senate, as recorded in the inscription on the architrave (CIL vi. 937). It is represented on three fragments of the Marble Plan (22, 23, 30), and is mentioned in Reg. (Not. Reg. VIII). Throughout the republic this temple contained the state treasury, the aera
i. 8. 5; Rosch. iv. 431), which was carried in triumphal processions (Dionys. vii. 72. 13). The day of dedication was the Saturnalia, 17th December (Fast. Amit. ad xvi Kal. Ian., CIL is. p. 245, 337; Liv. xxii. I. 19). There are a few blocks of the podium of the original temple still remaining, and a drain below and in front is probably as early, in which case it and some similar drains close by are the earliest examples of the stone arch in Italy (TF 51-54 attributes the drain to the fourth century B.C., but his suggestion as to its object is unacceptable). There is no trace of any construction of an intermediate period, and the existing podium belongs to the temple of Plancus. It is constructed of walls of travertine and peperino, with concrete filling, and was covered with marble facing. It is 22.50 metres wide, about 40 long, and its front and east side rise very high above the forum because of the slope of the Capitoline hill. The temple was Ionic, hexastyle prostyle, with two co
tolinus from the temple to the Capitolium (Liv. xli. 27. 7). In 42 B.C. the temple was rebuilt by L. Munatius Plancus (Suet. Aug. 29; CIL vi. 1316; x. 6087). It is mentioned incidentally in 16 A.D. (Tac. Ann. ii. 41), and at some time in the fourth century it was injured by fire and restored by vote of the senate, as recorded in the inscription on the architrave (CIL vi. 937). It is represented on three fragments of the Marble Plan (22, 23, 30), and is mentioned in Reg. (Not. Reg. VIII). Througg the cornice to the Augustan period, on the analogy of several other cornices (T. Divi Iuli, Magnae Matris, Regia, etc.). The architrave blocks with the palmette frieze belowthem belong to the forum of Trajan,whence theywere removed for the fourth century restoration (ibid. 62-66). The front columns are of grey and those on the sides of red granite, while the entablature is of white marble. The columns are 11 metres in height and 1.43 in diameter at the base; but in some of them the drums that