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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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at much of the damage had already been done in the fourth century; but one, that of L. Scipio Barbatus, consul in 298 B.C., and apparently the first to be buried there, was preserved and is now in the Vatican, together with portions of several others and their original inscriptions. These inscriptions (CIL 12. 6-16=vi. 1284-1294) record the burial of eight members of the family, from Barbatus (vid. sup.) to Paulla Cornelia, wife of a certain Hispallus of unknown date but probably later than 150 B.C. (RE iv. 1600, No. 445). Some of them are written in the Saturnian metre and are extremely valuable for the history of Latin literature and phonology, but they are probably later than the date usually assigned to them. That of Barbatus, for instance, is probably not earlier than the second Punic war (Bticheler, Carm. Lat. Epig. i. Nos. 6-9; W6lfflin, Bayr. Sitz.-Ber. 1892, i. 188-219). Of the sarcophagi, that of Barbatus alone was decorated with a Doric entablature with Ionic volutes. The o
xxxviii. 56). The statues of Publius and Lucius Scipio are also said to have been placed in the tomb (Liv. loc. cit.). As the Scipios regularly followed the practice of inhumation and not cremation (Cic. de legg. ii. 57), the tomb was filled with sarcophagi, arranged for the most part in loculi cut in the tufa rock. (It is probable that there was a quarry here before the tomb was made.) The tomb was opened early in the seventeenth century, and one sarcophagus, that of L. Scipio, consul in 259 B.C., was broken and its inscribed lid removed, but the final excavation of the monument was carried out in 1780 (Piranesi e Visconti, Monumenti degli Scipioni, Roma 1785 =Visconti, Opere varie, Milan 1827, i. 1-70; Nibby, Roma Antica, ii. 561-575). Many of the sarcophagi were then broken and their contents scattered (CIL i². pp. 373-375), though Hilsen, to whom the description of the tomb in CIL cit. is due, considers that much of the damage had already been done in the fourth century; but one,
ved, but the final excavation of the monument was carried out in 1780 (Piranesi e Visconti, Monumenti degli Scipioni, Roma 1785 =Visconti, Opere varie, Milan 1827, i. 1-70; Nibby, Roma Antica, ii. 561-575). Many of the sarcophagi were then broken and their contents scattered (CIL i². pp. 373-375), though Hilsen, to whom the description of the tomb in CIL cit. is due, considers that much of the damage had already been done in the fourth century; but one, that of L. Scipio Barbatus, consul in 298 B.C., and apparently the first to be buried there, was preserved and is now in the Vatican, together with portions of several others and their original inscriptions. These inscriptions (CIL 12. 6-16=vi. 1284-1294) record the burial of eight members of the family, from Barbatus (vid. sup.) to Paulla Cornelia, wife of a certain Hispallus of unknown date but probably later than 150 B.C. (RE iv. 1600, No. 445). Some of them are written in the Saturnian metre and are extremely valuable for the histo
1600 AD - 1699 AD (search for this): entry sep-scipionum
us (Cic. pro Arch. 22; Plin. NH vii. I 14; Suet. de poet. 8; Liv. xxxviii. 56). The statues of Publius and Lucius Scipio are also said to have been placed in the tomb (Liv. loc. cit.). As the Scipios regularly followed the practice of inhumation and not cremation (Cic. de legg. ii. 57), the tomb was filled with sarcophagi, arranged for the most part in loculi cut in the tufa rock. (It is probable that there was a quarry here before the tomb was made.) The tomb was opened early in the seventeenth century, and one sarcophagus, that of L. Scipio, consul in 259 B.C., was broken and its inscribed lid removed, but the final excavation of the monument was carried out in 1780 (Piranesi e Visconti, Monumenti degli Scipioni, Roma 1785 =Visconti, Opere varie, Milan 1827, i. 1-70; Nibby, Roma Antica, ii. 561-575). Many of the sarcophagi were then broken and their contents scattered (CIL i². pp. 373-375), though Hilsen, to whom the description of the tomb in CIL cit. is due, considers that much o
o, consul in 259 B.C., was broken and its inscribed lid removed, but the final excavation of the monument was carried out in 1780 (Piranesi e Visconti, Monumenti degli Scipioni, Roma 1785 =Visconti, Opere varie, Milan 1827, i. 1-70; Nibby, Roma Antica, ii. 561-575). Many of the sarcophagi were then broken and their contents scattered (CIL i². pp. 373-375), though Hilsen, to whom the description of the tomb in CIL cit. is due, considers that much of the damage had already been done in the fourth century; but one, that of L. Scipio Barbatus, consul in 298 B.C., and apparently the first to be buried there, was preserved and is now in the Vatican, together with portions of several others and their original inscriptions. These inscriptions (CIL 12. 6-16=vi. 1284-1294) record the burial of eight members of the family, from Barbatus (vid. sup.) to Paulla Cornelia, wife of a certain Hispallus of unknown date but probably later than 150 B.C. (RE iv. 1600, No. 445). Some of them are written in