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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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tur. quod etiam post Alexander cum vellet facere, ab haruspicibus dicitur esse prohibitus, cum hoc sciscitans non litasset; cf. Hist. Aug. Geta 7; Chron. 147; Hieron. ad a. Abr. 2216: Severo imperante thermae Severianae apud Antiochiam et Romam factae et Septizonium exstructum; Cassiod.: Septizodium instructum est; Not. Reg. X: Septizonium divi Severi). The inscription (CIL vi. 1032, 31229) records the dedication in 203 A.D.; and the building is undoubtedly referred to by Amm. Marc. in 355 (15. 7. 3: cum plebs excita calore quo consuevit. . ad Septemzodium convenisset celebrum locum ubi operis ambitiosi nymfaeum Marcus condidit imperator) when the mention of Marcus instead of Severus is due to the fact that the name Marcus appears first in the dedicatory inscription. According to the Vita, therefore, Severus intended this building to serve as a monumental faSade at this corner of the hill, visible to all who approached by the via Appia, and also as an entrance to the impe
is aedibus, id est regium atrium, ab ea parte facere voluisse perhibetur. quod etiam post Alexander cum vellet facere, ab haruspicibus dicitur esse prohibitus, cum hoc sciscitans non litasset; cf. Hist. Aug. Geta 7; Chron. 147; Hieron. ad a. Abr. 2216: Severo imperante thermae Severianae apud Antiochiam et Romam factae et Septizonium exstructum; Cassiod.: Septizodium instructum est; Not. Reg. X: Septizonium divi Severi). The inscription (CIL vi. 1032, 31229) records the dedication in 203 A.D.; and the building is undoubtedly referred to by Amm. Marc. in 355 (15. 7. 3: cum plebs excita calore quo consuevit. . ad Septemzodium convenisset celebrum locum ubi operis ambitiosi nymfaeum Marcus condidit imperator) when the mention of Marcus instead of Severus is due to the fact that the name Marcus appears first in the dedicatory inscription. According to the Vita, therefore, Severus intended this building to serve as a monumental faSade at this corner of the hill, visible to all
orated with fountains; and it also seems clear that the interior, which would have served no useful purpose, was not originally accessible except by means of ladders. There is no evidence for an external staircase at the back. Dombart (p. 96) has misquoted Demontosius, Gallus Romae Hospes, 25. A very difficult problem is presented by the name and its meaning. The form septizodium is first found in the Pseudo-Dositheus (about 207 A.D.) and in an inscription, CIL viii. (Suppl.) 14372 (about 210 A.D.), but is probably to be treated as incorrect and may therefore be disregarded (Schtirer, Zeitschr. f. d. neutestamentliche Wissenschaft vi. (1905), 29ff., 63 ff.). Unsuccessful attempts have been made to interpret septizonium in a literal sense, and to see in it a building which is capable of division, whether horizontally or vertically, into seven sections or belts. There is no doubt, however, that the building only had three stories. The reference to the seven planets (Maass, Tagesgbtter
ng. There appears indeed to be no doubt that it was actually decorated with fountains; and it also seems clear that the interior, which would have served no useful purpose, was not originally accessible except by means of ladders. There is no evidence for an external staircase at the back. Dombart (p. 96) has misquoted Demontosius, Gallus Romae Hospes, 25. A very difficult problem is presented by the name and its meaning. The form septizodium is first found in the Pseudo-Dositheus (about 207 A.D.) and in an inscription, CIL viii. (Suppl.) 14372 (about 210 A.D.), but is probably to be treated as incorrect and may therefore be disregarded (Schtirer, Zeitschr. f. d. neutestamentliche Wissenschaft vi. (1905), 29ff., 63 ff.). Unsuccessful attempts have been made to interpret septizonium in a literal sense, and to see in it a building which is capable of division, whether horizontally or vertically, into seven sections or belts. There is no doubt, however, that the building only had thre