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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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scussion see Mitt. 1920, 154-168.*lakwniko/n is here an adjective (see also the translation in the Loeb series); while in Vitr. v. 10 and elsewhere it means a hot room with cold plunge baths in it. in 25 B.C. at the same time as the PANTHEON (q.v.); and at his death in 12 he left to the Roman people, for their free use, a balanei=on (liv. 29. 4; Sid. Apoll. carm. 23. 496: balnea.. quae Agrippa dedit). As the AQUA VIRGO (q.v.), which supplied these baths with water, was not completed until 19 B.C., it is probable that the laconicum was the original part of what afterwards became a complete establishment for bathing, which was then regularly called thermae. Agrippa adorned these baths with works of art, among which are mentioned paintings (Plin. NH xxxv. 26), and the Apoxyomenos of Lysippus, which was set up in front of them (id. xxxiv. 62). The hot rooms he is said to have finished with fresco on tiles (id. xxxvi. 189). The thermae were burned in 80 A.D. (Cass. Dio lxvi. 24: bal
p in front of them (id. xxxiv. 62). The hot rooms he is said to have finished with fresco on tiles (id. xxxvi. 189). The thermae were burned in 80 A.D. (Cass. Dio lxvi. 24: balanei=on), but must have been restored by Titus or Domitian, for they are mentioned by Martial (iii. 20. 15, 36. 6) as much frequented. Another restoration was carried out by Hadrian (Hist. Aug. Hadr. 19: Romae instauravit lavacrum Agrippae; cf. also a reference in CIL vi. 9797=AL 294). An inscription (vi. 1165) of 344/5 A.D. recording a restoration by Constantius and Constans of 'termas vetustate labefactas' was found near the church of S. Maria in Monterone close' to the west side of the baths of Agrippa, and therefore probably refers to them. They are mentioned in the Regionary Catalogue (Reg. IX), by Sid. Apollinaris (loc. cit.), and in the sixth century (Greg. Magn. Reg. vi. 42; ix. 137; Kehr i. 98). By the seventh century the destruction of the building was well under way, and that its marble was burned int
set up in front of them (id. xxxiv. 62). The hot rooms he is said to have finished with fresco on tiles (id. xxxvi. 189). The thermae were burned in 80 A.D. (Cass. Dio lxvi. 24: balanei=on), but must have been restored by Titus or Domitian, for they are mentioned by Martial (iii. 20. 15, 36. 6) as much frequented. Another restoration was carried out by Hadrian (Hist. Aug. Hadr. 19: Romae instauravit lavacrum Agrippae; cf. also a reference in CIL vi. 9797=AL 294). An inscription (vi. 1165) of 344/5 A.D. recording a restoration by Constantius and Constans of 'termas vetustate labefactas' was found near the church of S. Maria in Monterone close' to the west side of the baths of Agrippa, and therefore probably refers to them. They are mentioned in the Regionary Catalogue (Reg. IX), by Sid. Apollinaris (loc. cit.), and in the sixth century (Greg. Magn. Reg. vi. 42; ix. 137; Kehr i. 98). By the seventh century the destruction of the building was well under way, and that its marble was burn
was not completed until 19 B.C., it is probable that the laconicum was the original part of what afterwards became a complete establishment for bathing, which was then regularly called thermae. Agrippa adorned these baths with works of art, among which are mentioned paintings (Plin. NH xxxv. 26), and the Apoxyomenos of Lysippus, which was set up in front of them (id. xxxiv. 62). The hot rooms he is said to have finished with fresco on tiles (id. xxxvi. 189). The thermae were burned in 80 A.D. (Cass. Dio lxvi. 24: balanei=on), but must have been restored by Titus or Domitian, for they are mentioned by Martial (iii. 20. 15, 36. 6) as much frequented. Another restoration was carried out by Hadrian (Hist. Aug. Hadr. 19: Romae instauravit lavacrum Agrippae; cf. also a reference in CIL vi. 9797=AL 294). An inscription (vi. 1165) of 344/5 A.D. recording a restoration by Constantius and Constans of 'termas vetustate labefactas' was found near the church of S. Maria in Monterone close'
me. According to Cassius Dio (liii. 27. I) Agrippa built a hot-air bath (to\ puriath/rion to\ *lakwniko/n) The passage continues: *lakwniko\n ga\r to\ gumna/sion e)peidh/per oi( lakedaimo/nioi gumnou=sqai te e)n tw=| to/te kro/nw| kai\ li/pa a)skei=n ma/lista e)do/koun, e)peka/lese.. For a discussion see Mitt. 1920, 154-168.*lakwniko/n is here an adjective (see also the translation in the Loeb series); while in Vitr. v. 10 and elsewhere it means a hot room with cold plunge baths in it. in 25 B.C. at the same time as the PANTHEON (q.v.); and at his death in 12 he left to the Roman people, for their free use, a balanei=on (liv. 29. 4; Sid. Apoll. carm. 23. 496: balnea.. quae Agrippa dedit). As the AQUA VIRGO (q.v.), which supplied these baths with water, was not completed until 19 B.C., it is probable that the laconicum was the original part of what afterwards became a complete establishment for bathing, which was then regularly called thermae. Agrippa adorned these baths with w
Agrippae; cf. also a reference in CIL vi. 9797=AL 294). An inscription (vi. 1165) of 344/5 A.D. recording a restoration by Constantius and Constans of 'termas vetustate labefactas' was found near the church of S. Maria in Monterone close' to the west side of the baths of Agrippa, and therefore probably refers to them. They are mentioned in the Regionary Catalogue (Reg. IX), by Sid. Apollinaris (loc. cit.), and in the sixth century (Greg. Magn. Reg. vi. 42; ix. 137; Kehr i. 98). By the seventh century the destruction of the building was well under way, and that its marble was burned into lime is shown by the name Calcararium, applied to the immediate vicinity somewhat later (Mirabilia 23; Jord. ii. 439; LS i. 25). They are, however, mentioned as Thermae Commodianae in Eins. 1. 4; 2. 4; 4. 8; 8. 6. The general plan of these thermae is known from a fragment of the Marble Plan found in 1900 (NS 1900, 633-634; BC 1901, 3-19; LS ii. 209; Mitt. 1905, 75); from drawings and plans of the si
arried out by Hadrian (Hist. Aug. Hadr. 19: Romae instauravit lavacrum Agrippae; cf. also a reference in CIL vi. 9797=AL 294). An inscription (vi. 1165) of 344/5 A.D. recording a restoration by Constantius and Constans of 'termas vetustate labefactas' was found near the church of S. Maria in Monterone close' to the west side of the baths of Agrippa, and therefore probably refers to them. They are mentioned in the Regionary Catalogue (Reg. IX), by Sid. Apollinaris (loc. cit.), and in the sixth century (Greg. Magn. Reg. vi. 42; ix. 137; Kehr i. 98). By the seventh century the destruction of the building was well under way, and that its marble was burned into lime is shown by the name Calcararium, applied to the immediate vicinity somewhat later (Mirabilia 23; Jord. ii. 439; LS i. 25). They are, however, mentioned as Thermae Commodianae in Eins. 1. 4; 2. 4; 4. 8; 8. 6. The general plan of these thermae is known from a fragment of the Marble Plan found in 1900 (NS 1900, 633-634; BC 1901,
y the destruction of the building was well under way, and that its marble was burned into lime is shown by the name Calcararium, applied to the immediate vicinity somewhat later (Mirabilia 23; Jord. ii. 439; LS i. 25). They are, however, mentioned as Thermae Commodianae in Eins. 1. 4; 2. 4; 4. 8; 8. 6. The general plan of these thermae is known from a fragment of the Marble Plan found in 1900 (NS 1900, 633-634; BC 1901, 3-19; LS ii. 209; Mitt. 1905, 75); from drawings and plans of the sixteenth century (NS 1882, 347-351) when much of the structure was still standing-three 519,/PAGE> in particular, one of Baldassare Peruzzi (Uffizi 456 Uffizi 456, 642 =Hulsen, Thermen des Agrippa, pi. v.; fig. 6=Bartoli, Monumenti di Roma ii. pl. 175; ii. pl. 393. ; Geymiuller, Documents inedits sur les thermes d'Agrippa, Lausanne 1883; NS 1882, pl. xxi.), a second of Palladio in the Devonshire collection (port. ix.f. 14; Rossi's edition of the Terme dei Romani, Vicenza 1797, pl. ii.; BC 1901, pi.
t to the east side of the Via dei Cestari, and having its southern limit a little north of the Corso Vittorio Emanuele. Just north of the centre of the building was a circular hall about 25 metres in diameter, belonging to a later reconstruction in a period not earlier than Alexander Severus(RA 127, 128; 175, 176), with the earliest known example of meridian ribs in its dome, the arco della Ciambella, by which name it was known as early as 1505 (BC 1901, 16), shown in sketches of the seventeenth century (e.g. that of Giovannoli, BC 1901, pl. iv.) when it was still complete. It is now only partially preserved and is visible behind the houses in the Via dell' Arco della Ciambella. It was probably a sort of general assembly hall, the social centre of the baths. The arrangement of the other rooms is uncertain, but the caldarium was probably directly west of the circular hall. On the west side of the thermae was an artificial pool or STAGNUM (q.v.). The plan is very like that of the large