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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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m absoluto opere pulcri cultus; quibus confectis cum Syriam circumgrederetur, anno potentiae sexto (217 A.D.) moritur (from which Hist. Aug. Carac. 9 is probably derived); cf. also Eutrop. 8. 20; Chron. 147. The commencement of the building may be fixed by the fact that the brickstamps with Geta's name not yet erased (CIL xv. 769. 3, 4), which have been found in use in its construction, can only belong to the period between February 211 and February 212. A quarry mark with the consular date 206 A.D. upon a mass of Greek statuary marble (Ann. d. Inst. 1870, p. 193, No. 279) has nothing to do with the date of the commencement of the thermae. A lead pipe found here (CIL xv. 7381) bears the names of Q. Aiacius Modestus and Q. Aiacius Censorinus, of whom the former is probably identical with one of the quindecimviri sacris faciundis of the ludi saeculares of 204 A.D. (CIL vi. 32327-32329, 32332; cf. p. 3261), who was legatus of upper Germany between 209 and 211 A.D. CIL xiii. 7417 (in the n
n its construction, can only belong to the period between February 211 and February 212. A quarry mark with the consular date 206 A.D. upon a mass of Greek statuary marble (Ann. d. Inst. 1870, p. 193, No. 279) has nothing to do with the date of the commencement of the thermae. A lead pipe found here (CIL xv. 7381) bears the names of Q. Aiacius Modestus and Q. Aiacius Censorinus, of whom the former is probably identical with one of the quindecimviri sacris faciundis of the ludi saeculares of 204 A.D. (CIL vi. 32327-32329, 32332; cf. p. 3261), who was legatus of upper Germany between 209 and 211 A.D. CIL xiii. 7417 (in the notes the date is wrongly given as 209-214), 7441. Elagabalus (Hist. Aug. Heliog. 17. 8) is said to have added porticoes which were finished by Alexander Severus (cf. id. Alex. 25. 6); but the truth of the statement is doubtful (SHA 1916. 7. A, 7-8), though it has generally been taken to refer to the peribolus. Hulsen, who had already pointed out that not a single br
tain (cf. p. 32). Cf. also the list in Iwanoff-Hiilsen, op. cit. infra, 72-80. cf. Nicole, Un Catalogue d'ceuvres d'art conserves a Rome a l'epoque imperiale (Geneva, 1906). Some porticoes connected with the baths (whatever is meant) were destroyed or damaged by fire, and repaired under Aurelian (Chron. 148: porticus Thermarum Antoninarum arserunt et fabricatum est). A brick-stamp of the time of Constans or Constantius (not found in situ) gives some evidence of activity about the middle of the fourth century (CIL xv. 1542. 3) Ib. 1580 a was found (as well as ib. 1665) in some late tombs in the peribolus (NS 1912, 310), and is referred to as' frequently occurring' in the thermae (a fact not mentioned in CIL). , while we have dedicatory inscriptions upon the bases of statues set up by the praefectus urbi to Victoria and to the victorious emperors Valentinian and Valens towards the end of it (CIL vi. 794, 1170-1173). In the fifth century the baths are named among the marvels of Rome (Pol
dicatory inscription; cf. Aur. Victor. Caesar. 21: ad lavandum absoluto opere pulcri cultus; quibus confectis cum Syriam circumgrederetur, anno potentiae sexto (217 A.D.) moritur (from which Hist. Aug. Carac. 9 is probably derived); cf. also Eutrop. 8. 20; Chron. 147. The commencement of the building may be fixed by the fact that the brickstamps with Geta's name not yet erased (CIL xv. 769. 3, 4), which have been found in use in its construction, can only belong to the period between February 211 and February 212. A quarry mark with the consular date 206 A.D. upon a mass of Greek statuary marble (Ann. d. Inst. 1870, p. 193, No. 279) has nothing to do with the date of the commencement of the thermae. A lead pipe found here (CIL xv. 7381) bears the names of Q. Aiacius Modestus and Q. Aiacius Censorinus, of whom the former is probably identical with one of the quindecimviri sacris faciundis of the ludi saeculares of 204 A.D. (CIL vi. 32327-32329, 32332; cf. p. 3261), who was legatus of u
ion; cf. Aur. Victor. Caesar. 21: ad lavandum absoluto opere pulcri cultus; quibus confectis cum Syriam circumgrederetur, anno potentiae sexto (217 A.D.) moritur (from which Hist. Aug. Carac. 9 is probably derived); cf. also Eutrop. 8. 20; Chron. 147. The commencement of the building may be fixed by the fact that the brickstamps with Geta's name not yet erased (CIL xv. 769. 3, 4), which have been found in use in its construction, can only belong to the period between February 211 and February 212. A quarry mark with the consular date 206 A.D. upon a mass of Greek statuary marble (Ann. d. Inst. 1870, p. 193, No. 279) has nothing to do with the date of the commencement of the thermae. A lead pipe found here (CIL xv. 7381) bears the names of Q. Aiacius Modestus and Q. Aiacius Censorinus, of whom the former is probably identical with one of the quindecimviri sacris faciundis of the ludi saeculares of 204 A.D. (CIL vi. 32327-32329, 32332; cf. p. 3261), who was legatus of upper Germany betw
nd on. the right of the via Appia, a little beyond the porta Capena. Hier. ad Euseb. a. Abr. 2231: Antoninus Romae thermas sui nominis aedificavit, fixes the date of their dedication as 216 A.D. Breval, Remarks on Several Parts of Europe, Ser. I (1726), ii. 259, saw the letters .... ONINI on the exterior, perhaps a fragment of the dedicatory inscription; cf. Aur. Victor. Caesar. 21: ad lavandum absoluto opere pulcri cultus; quibus confectis cum Syriam circumgrederetur, anno potentiae sexto (217 A.D.) moritur (from which Hist. Aug. Carac. 9 is probably derived); cf. also Eutrop. 8. 20; Chron. 147. The commencement of the building may be fixed by the fact that the brickstamps with Geta's name not yet erased (CIL xv. 769. 3, 4), which have been found in use in its construction, can only belong to the period between February 211 and February 212. A quarry mark with the consular date 206 A.D. upon a mass of Greek statuary marble (Ann. d. Inst. 1870, p. 193, No. 279) has nothing to do with t
). In the fifth century the baths are named among the marvels of Rome (Pol. Silv. 545; Olympiod. ap. Phot. p. 63a Bekk.: ai( de\ )*antwnianai\ ... ei)s xrwi/an tw=n louome/nwn kaqe/e/drass ei)=xon parakaime/nas xili/as e(cakosi/ase)c narna/rou kateskeuasme/nas cestou=. Cf. THERMAE DIOCLETIANI), and there is evidence of restoration under Theodoric in the sixth century (CIL xv. 1665. 3, 4; 1669. 7), but their use must have been rendered impossible when the aqueducts were cut by the Goths in 537 A.D. The ruins were less affected than those of many other buildings by the devastations of the Middle Ages, though evidence has been found here too of the harm wrought by the earthquake of 847 (a column in the xystus resting on a mass of debris; see BASILICA AEMILIA). The name occurs in Eins. (11. 2; 13. 25) and under various forms (palatium Antonianum, l'Antoniana, etc.) right through the Middle Ages. Discovery and destruction went hand in hand under Paul III (LS passim; DAP 2. xv. 369). The c
ken to refer to the peribolus. Hulsen, who had already pointed out that not a single brick-stamp is to be found in the peribolus (Hulsen-Iwanoff, op. cit. 57--an observation which is confirmed by the excavations of 1912), is inclined to accept this statement: for, as is well known, the practice of stamping bricks went out of use after the reign of Caracalla until the time of Diocletian. See also p. 531, n. I. For a catalogue of the works of art which the baths contained about the middle of the third century, The restoration 'Herculem G[lycon]is' (the Hercules now at Naples, 1. 6) is almost certain (cf. p. 32). Cf. also the list in Iwanoff-Hiilsen, op. cit. infra, 72-80. cf. Nicole, Un Catalogue d'ceuvres d'art conserves a Rome a l'epoque imperiale (Geneva, 1906). Some porticoes connected with the baths (whatever is meant) were destroyed or damaged by fire, and repaired under Aurelian (Chron. 148: porticus Thermarum Antoninarum arserunt et fabricatum est). A brick-stamp of the time o
THERMAE ANTONINIANAE (CARACALLAE) * (Capsararius de Antoninianas (sic) in (CIL vi. 9232) a fifth (?) century inscription): the thermae built by Caracalla on the VIA NOVA (q.v.), which he constructed parallel to and on. the right of the via Appia, a little beyond the porta Capena. Hier. ad Euseb. a. Abr. 2231: Antoninus Romae thermas sui nominis aedificavit, fixes the date of their dedication as 216 A.D. Breval, Remarks on Several Parts of Europe, Ser. I (1726), ii. 259, saw the letters .... ONINI on the exterior, perhaps a fragment of the dedicatory inscription; cf. Aur. Victor. Caesar. 21: ad lavandum absoluto opere pulcri cultus; quibus confectis cum Syriam circumgrederetur, anno potentiae sexto (217 A.D.) moritur (from which Hist. Aug. Carac. 9 is probably derived); cf. also Eutrop. 8. 20; Chron. 147. The commencement of the building may be fixed by the fact that the brickstamps with Geta's name not yet erased (CIL xv. 769. 3, 4), which have been found in use in its construction
mark with the consular date 206 A.D. upon a mass of Greek statuary marble (Ann. d. Inst. 1870, p. 193, No. 279) has nothing to do with the date of the commencement of the thermae. A lead pipe found here (CIL xv. 7381) bears the names of Q. Aiacius Modestus and Q. Aiacius Censorinus, of whom the former is probably identical with one of the quindecimviri sacris faciundis of the ludi saeculares of 204 A.D. (CIL vi. 32327-32329, 32332; cf. p. 3261), who was legatus of upper Germany between 209 and 211 A.D. CIL xiii. 7417 (in the notes the date is wrongly given as 209-214), 7441. Elagabalus (Hist. Aug. Heliog. 17. 8) is said to have added porticoes which were finished by Alexander Severus (cf. id. Alex. 25. 6); but the truth of the statement is doubtful (SHA 1916. 7. A, 7-8), though it has generally been taken to refer to the peribolus. Hulsen, who had already pointed out that not a single brick-stamp is to be found in the peribolus (Hulsen-Iwanoff, op. cit. 57--an observation which is c
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