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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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th the building of the circus Gai et Neronis, which was also called circus Vaticanus (Plin. NI-I xvi. 201; xxxvi. 74), increased importance was given to this particular area, and Vaticanum then came to be used of the circus itself, as well as of the whole district (Suet. Claud. 21. 2: circenses frequenter etiam in Vaticano commisit; Amm. Marcell. xvii. 4. 16: quorum unus (obeliscus) in Vaticano; Not. Reg. XIV, cf. however, Pr. Reg. 207). Another application of the name Vaticanum seems to have been to the shrine of the Magna Mater, whose cult was established close to the circus (cf. FRIGIANUM), if we may judge from an inscription found at Lyon (CIL xiii. 1751: L. Aemilius Carpus vires excepit et a Vaticano transtulit; cf. also an inscription of 236 A.D. from Kastell near Mayence, ib. 728 : deae Virtuti Bellonae montem Vaticanum vetustate conlabsum restituerun(t) hastiferi civitatis Mattiacor.) (Jord. i. I. 438; HJ 623; Gilb. ii. 122; iii. 449; and especially Elter, RhM 1891, 112-138).
tius nominis rationem: non sicut Aius.. ita Vaticanus deus nominatus penes quem essent vocis humanae initia . .), who gives two current explanations of the name. It is probable that the adjective form, Vaticanus, is derived from some substantive, perhaps Vaticanum (Elter, see below), or from the early Etruscan name of some settlement, like Vatica or Vaticum (Niebuhr), of which all other traces have vanished, except possibly the cognomen Vaticanus which is found twice in the consular Fasti in 455 and 451 B.C. (RE i. A. 1071 ; BC 1908, 23-26). (2) VATICANI MONTES without much doubt a general designation for the hills in the ager Vaticanus, but used, in its only occurrence in litera- ture, of the long ridge from the Janiculum to the modern Monte Mario (Cic. ad Att. xiii. 33. 4: a ponte Milvio Tiberim duci sccundum montes Vaticanos, campum Martium coacdificari, illum autem campus Vaticanum fieri quasi Martium campum). Here campus Vaticanus must be used of the whole district betwe
VATICANUS AGER (1) VATICANUS AGER the district on the right bank of the Tiber, between its lower reaches and the more restricted Veientine territory (Plin. NH iii. 53: Tiberis . . citra xvi milia passuum urbis Veientem agrum a Crustumino, dein Fidenatem Latinumque a Vaticano Dirimens; Liv. x. 26. 15 (295 B.C.): alii duo exercitus baud procul urbe Etruriae oppositi unus in Falisco, alter in Vaticano agro). Its fertility is spoken of slightingly by Cicero (de leg. agr. ii. 96), its wines are frequently derided by Martial (i. 18. 2; vi. 92. 3; x. 45. 5; xii. 48. 14), and references to farms or estates are very few (Gell. xix. 17. I:in agro Vaticano Iulius Paulus poeta. .. herediolum tenue possidebat; Symm. Ep. vi. 58. I: rus Vaticanum quod vestro praedio cohaeret Accessimus; vii. 21: urbanas turbas Vaticano in quantum licet rure Declino). This name continued long in use, for it occurs in Solinus (ii. 34: Claudio principe ubi Vaticanus ager est in alveo occisae boae spectatus est so
is rationem: non sicut Aius.. ita Vaticanus deus nominatus penes quem essent vocis humanae initia . .), who gives two current explanations of the name. It is probable that the adjective form, Vaticanus, is derived from some substantive, perhaps Vaticanum (Elter, see below), or from the early Etruscan name of some settlement, like Vatica or Vaticum (Niebuhr), of which all other traces have vanished, except possibly the cognomen Vaticanus which is found twice in the consular Fasti in 455 and 451 B.C. (RE i. A. 1071 ; BC 1908, 23-26). (2) VATICANI MONTES without much doubt a general designation for the hills in the ager Vaticanus, but used, in its only occurrence in litera- ture, of the long ridge from the Janiculum to the modern Monte Mario (Cic. ad Att. xiii. 33. 4: a ponte Milvio Tiberim duci sccundum montes Vaticanos, campum Martium coacdificari, illum autem campus Vaticanum fieri quasi Martium campum). Here campus Vaticanus must be used of the whole district between Monte Ma