hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
300 AD - 399 AD 90 90 Browse Search
1500 AD - 1599 AD 58 58 Browse Search
100 AD - 199 AD 31 31 Browse Search
500 AD - 599 AD 30 30 Browse Search
200 AD - 299 AD 24 24 Browse Search
179 BC 20 20 Browse Search
1400 AD - 1499 AD 19 19 Browse Search
400 AD - 499 AD 19 19 Browse Search
1100 AD - 1199 AD 17 17 Browse Search
700 AD - 799 AD 15 15 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

Found 2 total hits in 2 results.

ediovis (Fast. i. 293-294: Iuppiter in parte est: cepit locus unus utrumque / iunctaque sunt magno templa nepotis (sc. Aesculapii) avo); and another assumption that the entries in the Calendar (Fast. Praen. ad Kal. Ian., CIL i. p. 231: [Aescu]lapio Vediovi in insula; Fast. Ant. ap. NS 1921, 83: Aesculap(io) Co[ns]o Vediove) refer necessarily to a temple of Vediovis. In the same way another passage in Livy (xxxi. 21. 12), where he is speaking of L. Furius Purpurio at the battle of Cremona in 200 B.C., may be made to refer to the same temple by reading: aedemque Vediovi (for the MSS. deo Iovi) vovit si eo die hostes fudisset. These emendations, and therefore the existence of the temple, near that of Aesculapius, are accepted by most scholars (cf. HJ 635: WR 236; Jord. Comm. in honor. Mommsen 359-362; Gilb. iii. 82-84; Mommsen, CIL 12. p. 305), but not by Besnier (249-272), who refuses to accept the identification of Vediovis and Iuppiter and explains the reference in the calendar by a sa
VEIOVIS, AEDES (templa, Ovid): a temple on the island in the Tiber, the evidence for the existence of which consists of an emended text in one passage in Livy (xxxiv. 53. 7 (194 B.C.): et in insula Vediovis The form 'Vediovis' is frequently found. (for MSS. Iovis) aedem C. Servilius duumvir dedicavit; vota erat sex annis ante Gallico bello ab L. Furio Purpurione praetore, ab eodem postea consule locata); the assumption that through ignorance of the facts Ovid used Iuppiter for Vediovis (Fast. i. 293-294: Iuppiter in parte est: cepit locus unus utrumque / iunctaque sunt magno templa nepotis (sc. Aesculapii) avo); and another assumption that the entries in the Calendar (Fast. Praen. ad Kal. Ian., CIL i. p. 231: [Aescu]lapio Vediovi in insula; Fast. Ant. ap. NS 1921, 83: Aesculap(io) Co[ns]o Vediove) refer necessarily to a temple of Vediovis. In the same way another passage in Livy (xxxi. 21. 12), where he is speaking of L. Furius Purpurio at the battle of Cremona in 200 B.C., may b