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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

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ther north- east than the modern Via di Porta S. Sebastiano. It was flanked by tombs and columbaria both within and without the walls. The first milestone was situated just inside the porta Appia (LS iii. I; CIL x. 6812-3; HF i. p. 409). The original road was only gravelled (glareo strata); in 296 B.C. a footpath was laid saxo quadrato from the gate to the templum Martis (Liv. x. 23. 12); three years later the whole road was paved with silex from the temple to Bovillae (ib. 47. 4), and in 189 B.C. the first mile, from the gate to the temple, was similarly treated (Liv. xxxviii. 28. 3). Its further course cannot be dealt with here. The description of the method of its construction in Procop. BG i. 14 is interesting; cf. Stat. Silv. iv. 3. 40-55. The earliest milestone we have belongs to about 250 B.C. (CIL i². 21), and others belong to Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian and Theodoric (CIL ix. 6075; x. 6812-6880; cf. p. 99 ; NS 1910, 292). For the road as a whole, see Canina, Via Appia, Rome 1853
rvian wall, and through the wall of Aurelian by the PORTA APPIA, curving slightly and ascending through a cutting (CLIVUS MARTIS) before it reached the latter. This part of its course ran a little further north- east than the modern Via di Porta S. Sebastiano. It was flanked by tombs and columbaria both within and without the walls. The first milestone was situated just inside the porta Appia (LS iii. I; CIL x. 6812-3; HF i. p. 409). The original road was only gravelled (glareo strata); in 296 B.C. a footpath was laid saxo quadrato from the gate to the templum Martis (Liv. x. 23. 12); three years later the whole road was paved with silex from the temple to Bovillae (ib. 47. 4), and in 189 B.C. the first mile, from the gate to the temple, was similarly treated (Liv. xxxviii. 28. 3). Its further course cannot be dealt with here. The description of the method of its construction in Procop. BG i. 14 is interesting; cf. Stat. Silv. iv. 3. 40-55. The earliest milestone we have belongs to
tpath was laid saxo quadrato from the gate to the templum Martis (Liv. x. 23. 12); three years later the whole road was paved with silex from the temple to Bovillae (ib. 47. 4), and in 189 B.C. the first mile, from the gate to the temple, was similarly treated (Liv. xxxviii. 28. 3). Its further course cannot be dealt with here. The description of the method of its construction in Procop. BG i. 14 is interesting; cf. Stat. Silv. iv. 3. 40-55. The earliest milestone we have belongs to about 250 B.C. (CIL i². 21), and others belong to Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian and Theodoric (CIL ix. 6075; x. 6812-6880; cf. p. 99 ; NS 1910, 292). For the road as a whole, see Canina, Via Appia, Rome 1853; T i. 35-71, 588-597; ix. 3-407; RE ii. 238-242; M61. 1903, 375-418; HJ 200, 209-213. For its curatores (who owe their institution to Claudius, with the other curatores of particular roads, see Senec. Apoc. I: Appiae viae curator est qua scis et Tiberium Caesarem et Augustum ad deos isse), see CIL ii. 192