hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
300 AD - 399 AD 90 90 Browse Search
1500 AD - 1599 AD 58 58 Browse Search
100 AD - 199 AD 31 31 Browse Search
500 AD - 599 AD 30 30 Browse Search
200 AD - 299 AD 24 24 Browse Search
179 BC 20 20 Browse Search
1400 AD - 1499 AD 19 19 Browse Search
400 AD - 499 AD 19 19 Browse Search
1100 AD - 1199 AD 17 17 Browse Search
700 AD - 799 AD 15 15 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome. Search the whole document.

Found 3 total hits in 3 results.

rum Flaminia tegitur cinis atque Latina), which, like the via Appia, ran in a straight line for the first ii miles. Liv. ii. 39 uses it, in speaking of Coriolanus, only as a geographical description; for it was not in existence so early. Its history is unknown, but its straightness of line shows that it was not a primitive road but an artificial military highway; and it was probably constructed after the pass of Algidus had been secured in 389 B.C.; and it must have run at least as early as 334 B.C. as far as Cales (Liv. x. 36). It was joined at three different points by the via Labicana or by branches. Strabo v. 3. 9, p. 237, shows that the via Latina was in his time regarded as the principal road, and indeed he classes it with the Appia and Valeria as among the most famous; but in later times the easier line taken by the via Labicana may have commended it to travellers, though the Latina was kept up also (for a milestone of Maxentius, see PBS i. 278). The distance being identical, th
(Iuv. i. 170: experiar quid concedatur in illos quorum Flaminia tegitur cinis atque Latina), which, like the via Appia, ran in a straight line for the first ii miles. Liv. ii. 39 uses it, in speaking of Coriolanus, only as a geographical description; for it was not in existence so early. Its history is unknown, but its straightness of line shows that it was not a primitive road but an artificial military highway; and it was probably constructed after the pass of Algidus had been secured in 389 B.C.; and it must have run at least as early as 334 B.C. as far as Cales (Liv. x. 36). It was joined at three different points by the via Labicana or by branches. Strabo v. 3. 9, p. 237, shows that the via Latina was in his time regarded as the principal road, and indeed he classes it with the Appia and Valeria as among the most famous; but in later times the easier line taken by the via Labicana may have commended it to travellers, though the Latina was kept up also (for a milestone of Maxentiu
200 AD - 299 AD (search for this): entry via-latina
d indeed he classes it with the Appia and Valeria as among the most famous; but in later times the easier line taken by the via Labicana may have commended it to travellers, though the Latina was kept up also (for a milestone of Maxentius, see PBS i. 278). The distance being identical, the milestones will agree with the numeration along either road (PBS iv. 7, 8). In any case the independent existence of both ceased at Casilinum, where they joined the via Appia. At the beginning of the third century A.D. the viae Labicana and Latina vetus were under one curator (CIL iii. 6154; x. 5394; EE iv. p. 223 name both roads-the via Latina is qualified as vetus in the first of these-ii. 1929; iii. 1455; vi. 1337, 1450; x. 3732; xi. 2106; xiv. 2942, 3595; BCH 1879, 272; Rev. Arch. 1889, ii. 126; and Stat. Silv. iv. 4. 60, only the Latina; vi. 332; x. 1259, only the Labicana), while there was a separate official for the via Latina Nova (x. 5398; see BC 1891, 112-121). What this last road was, we