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portions publicly, which were received with great applause. (Liban. Epist. DCCCCLXXXIII. p. 60, ed. Wolf.) The precise date of his death is not recorded, but it must have happened later than 390, since a reference occurs to the consulship of Neoterius, which belongs to that year. Works Rerum gestarum libri The work of Ammianus extended from the accession of Nerva, A. D. 96, the point at which the histories of Tacitus and the biographies of Suetonius terminated, to the death of Valens, A. D. 378, comprising a period of 282 years. It was divided into thirty-one books, of which the first thirteen are lost. The remaining eighteen embrace the acts of Constantius from A. D. 353, the seventeenth year of his reign, together with the whole career of Gallus, Julianus, Jovianus, Valentinianus, and Valens. The portion preserved includes the transactions of twenty-five years only, which proves that the earlier books must have presented a very condensed abridgment of the events contained in th
ater than 390, since a reference occurs to the consulship of Neoterius, which belongs to that year. Works Rerum gestarum libri The work of Ammianus extended from the accession of Nerva, A. D. 96, the point at which the histories of Tacitus and the biographies of Suetonius terminated, to the death of Valens, A. D. 378, comprising a period of 282 years. It was divided into thirty-one books, of which the first thirteen are lost. The remaining eighteen embrace the acts of Constantius from A. D. 353, the seventeenth year of his reign, together with the whole career of Gallus, Julianus, Jovianus, Valentinianus, and Valens. The portion preserved includes the transactions of twenty-five years only, which proves that the earlier books must have presented a very condensed abridgment of the events contained in the long space over which they stretched; and hence we may feel satisfied, that what has been saved is much more valuable than what has perished. Gibbon (cap. xxvi.) pays a well-des
Eventually he established himself at Rome, where he composed his history, and during the progress of the task read several portions publicly, which were received with great applause. (Liban. Epist. DCCCCLXXXIII. p. 60, ed. Wolf.) The precise date of his death is not recorded, but it must have happened later than 390, since a reference occurs to the consulship of Neoterius, which belongs to that year. Works Rerum gestarum libri The work of Ammianus extended from the accession of Nerva, A. D. 96, the point at which the histories of Tacitus and the biographies of Suetonius terminated, to the death of Valens, A. D. 378, comprising a period of 282 years. It was divided into thirty-one books, of which the first thirteen are lost. The remaining eighteen embrace the acts of Constantius from A. D. 353, the seventeenth year of his reign, together with the whole career of Gallus, Julianus, Jovianus, Valentinianus, and Valens. The portion preserved includes the transactions of twenty-five ye