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Browsing named entities in a specific section of A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). Search the whole document.

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Anaximander (*)Anaci/mandros) of Miletus, the son of Praxiades, born B. C. 610 (Apollod. apud Diog. Laert. 2.1, 2), was one of the earliest philosophers of the Ionian school, and is commonly said to have been instructed by his friend and countryman Thales, its first founder. (Cic. Ac. 2.37; Simplic. in Aristot. Phys. lib. i. fol. 6, a, ed. Aid.) Works He was the first author of a philosophical treatise in Greek prose, unless Pherecydes of Syros be an exception. (Themist. Orat. xxvi.) His work consisted, according to Diogenes, of summary statements of his opinions (pepoi/htai kefalaiw/dh th\n e)/kqesin), and was accidentally found by Apollodorus. Suidas gives the titles of several treatises supposed to have been written by him ; but they are evidently either invented, or derived from a misunderstanding of the expressions of earlier writers. Philosophy The early Ionian philosophy did not advance beyond the contemplation of the sensible world. But it was not in any proper sense ex
me of the solstices, by its shortest and longest meridian shadows; and of the equinoxes, by the rectilinear motion of the extremity of its shadow : to the latter two purposes Anaximander is said to have applied it; but since there is little evidence that the ecliptic and equinoctial circles were known in Greece at this period, it must be doubted whether the equinox was determined otherwise than by a rough observation of the equality of day and night. (Schaubach, p. 140, &c.) Life Anaximander flourished in the time of Polycrates of Samos, and died soon after the completion of his 64th year, in Ol. 58.2 (B. C. 547), according to Apollodorus. (apud Diog. l.c.) But since Polycrates began to reign B. C. 532, there must be some mistake in the time of Anaximander's death, unless the elder Polycrates (mentioned by Suidas, s. v. *)/Ibukos) be meant. (Clinton, Fast. Hell.) (For the ancient sources of information see Preller, Hist. Philosoph. Graeco-Romanae ex fontium locis contexta.) [W.F.D]
me of the solstices, by its shortest and longest meridian shadows; and of the equinoxes, by the rectilinear motion of the extremity of its shadow : to the latter two purposes Anaximander is said to have applied it; but since there is little evidence that the ecliptic and equinoctial circles were known in Greece at this period, it must be doubted whether the equinox was determined otherwise than by a rough observation of the equality of day and night. (Schaubach, p. 140, &c.) Life Anaximander flourished in the time of Polycrates of Samos, and died soon after the completion of his 64th year, in Ol. 58.2 (B. C. 547), according to Apollodorus. (apud Diog. l.c.) But since Polycrates began to reign B. C. 532, there must be some mistake in the time of Anaximander's death, unless the elder Polycrates (mentioned by Suidas, s. v. *)/Ibukos) be meant. (Clinton, Fast. Hell.) (For the ancient sources of information see Preller, Hist. Philosoph. Graeco-Romanae ex fontium locis contexta.) [W.F.D]