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Archela'us (*)Arxe/laos), king of MACEDONIA from B. C. 413 to 399. According to Plato, he was an illegitimate son of Perdiccas II. and obtained the throne by the murder of his uncle Alcetas, his cousin, and his half-brother (Plat. Gory. p. 471; Athen. 5.217d.; Ael. VH 12.43), further strengthening himself by marriage with Cleopatra, his father's widow. (Plat. Gory. p. 471c.; Aristot. Pol. 5.10, ed. Bekk.) Nor does there appear to be any valid reason for rejecting this story in spite of the silence of Thueydides, who had no occasion to refer to it, and of the remarks of Athenaeus, who ascribes it to Plato's love of scandal. (Thuc.2.100; Athen. 11.506a. e.; Mitford, Gr. Hist. ch. 34, sec. 1; Thirlwall, Gr. Hist. vol. v. p. 157.) In B. C. 410 Pydna revolted from Archelaus, but he reduced it with the aid of an Athenian squadron under Theramenes, and the better to retain it, in subjection, rebuilt it at a distance of about two miles from the coast. (Diod. 13.49; Wess. ad loc.) In another
then. 5.217d.; Ael. VH 12.43), further strengthening himself by marriage with Cleopatra, his father's widow. (Plat. Gory. p. 471c.; Aristot. Pol. 5.10, ed. Bekk.) Nor does there appear to be any valid reason for rejecting this story in spite of the silence of Thueydides, who had no occasion to refer to it, and of the remarks of Athenaeus, who ascribes it to Plato's love of scandal. (Thuc.2.100; Athen. 11.506a. e.; Mitford, Gr. Hist. ch. 34, sec. 1; Thirlwall, Gr. Hist. vol. v. p. 157.) In B. C. 410 Pydna revolted from Archelaus, but he reduced it with the aid of an Athenian squadron under Theramenes, and the better to retain it, in subjection, rebuilt it at a distance of about two miles from the coast. (Diod. 13.49; Wess. ad loc.) In another war, in which he was involved with Sirrhas and Arrhabaeus, he purchased peace by giving his daughter in marriage to the former. (Aristot. Polit. l.c.; comp. Thirlwall, Gr. Hist. vol. v. p. 158.) For the internal improvement and security of his ki