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ssa, and sometimes identical with the " Reges Osrhoenenses," afterwards in Armenia Magna. B. C. 38. Arsham or Ardsham, the Artabazes of Josephus. (Ant. Jud. 20.2.)--B. C. 10. Manu, his son.--B. C. 5. Abgarus, the son of Arsham, the Ushama of the Syrians. This is the celebrated Abgarus who is said to have written a letter to our Saviour. (Moses Chor. 2.29.) A. D. 32. Anane or Ananus, the son of Abgarus. --A. D. 36. Sanadrug or Sanatruces, the son of a sister of Abgares, usurps the throne.--A. D. 58. Erowant, an Arsacid by the female line, usurps the throne; conquers all Armenia; cedes Edessa and Mesopotamia to the Romans.--A. D. 78. Ardashes or Artaxes III. (Exedares or Axidares), the son of Sanadrug, established by Vologeses I., king of the Parthians.--A. D. 120. Ardawazt or Artavasdes IV., son of Ardashes III., reigns only some months.-- A. D. 121. Diran or Tiranus I., his brother.--A. D. 142. Dikran or Tigranes VI., driven out by Lucius (Martius) Verus, who puts Soaemus on the thro
Armenia again by Claudius, about A. D. 47, where he continued to reign, supported by the Romans, till he was expelled and put to death by his nephew Rhadamistus, A. D. 52. (Tac. Ann. 6.33, 9.8, 9, 12.44-47; D. C. 60.8.) Rhadamistus the son of Pharasmanes, king of Iberia, was a highly fitted but ambitious youth, whom his old father tied to get rid of by exciting him to invade Armenia, for which purpose he gave him an army. (A. D. 52.) Rhadamistus, seconded by the perfidy of the Roman praefect in Armenia, Pollio, succeeded in seizing upon the person of his uncle, whom he put to death with his wife and his children. Rhadamistus then ascended the throne; butus, surnamed Artaxias.--... Tigranes IV., son of Alexander Herodes.--A. D. 35. Arsaces II. --A. D. 35. Mithridates of Iberia.--A. D. 51. Rhadamistus of Iberia.--A. D. 52. Tiridates I.--A. D. 60. Tigranes V. of the race of Herodes.--A. D. 62. Tiridates I. re-established by Nero, reigned about eleven years longer. B. The second o
rrunner) of Asia Minor; murdered by the Arsacid Anag, who was the father of St. Gregory, the apostle of Armenia.--A. D. 232. Ardashir or Artaxerxes, the first Sassanid of Persia.--A. D. 259. Dertad or Tiridates II., surnamed Medz, the son of Chosroes, established by the Romans.--A. D. 314. Interregnum. Sanadrug seizes northern Armenia, and Pagur southern Armenia, but only for a short time.--A. D. 316. Chosroes or Khosrew II., surnamed P'hok'hr, or " the Little," the son of Tiridates Mezd.--A. D. 325. Diran or Tiranus I., his son.--A. D. 341. Arsaces or Arshag III., his son. --A. D. 370. Bab or Para.--A. D. 377. Waraztad, usurper.--A. D. 382. Arsaces IV. (and Valarsaces or Wagharshag II., his brother).--A. D. 387. Armenia divided.--A. D. 389. Arsaces IV. dies. Cazavon in Roman Armenia, Chosroes or Khosrew III. in Persarmenia.--A. D. 392. Bahram Shapur (Sapor), the brother of Chosroes III.--A. D. 414. Chosroes re-established by Yezdegerd.--A. D. 415. Shapur or Sapor, the son of Yezdege
. C. .... Tigranes III.--B. C. 6. Artavasdes II.--B. C. 5. Tigranes III. reestablished.--B. C. 2. Erato, queen. A. D. 2. Ariobarzanes, a Parthian prince, established by the Romans.--A. D. 4. Artavasdes III. or Artabases, his Son.--A. D. 5. Erato re-established ; death uncertain.-- .... Interregnum.--A. D. 16. Vonones.--A. D. 17. Interregnum.--A. D. 18. Zeno of Pontus, surnamed Artaxias.--... Tigranes IV., son of Alexander Herodes.--A. D. 35. Arsaces II. --A. D. 35. Mithridates of Iberia.--A. D. 51. Rhadamistus of Iberia.--A. D. 52. Tiridates I.--A. D. 60. Tigranes V. of the race of Herodes.--A. D. 62. Tiridates I. re-established by Nero, reigned about eleven years longer. B. The second or younger Branch, The second or younger branch, at first at Edessa, and sometimes identical with the " Reges Osrhoenenses," afterwards in Armenia Magna. B. C. 38. Arsham or Ardsham, the Artabazes of Josephus. (Ant. Jud. 20.2.)--B. C. 10. Manu, his son.--B. C. 5. Abgarus, the son of Arsham, the Usha
d ill A. D. 35, Mithridates invaded Armenia and took its capital, Artaxata. Josephus (18.3.4.) calls this Armenian king Orodes, but this was the name of his brother, who, as we learn from Tacitus, was sent by the Parthian king to revenge his death. (Tac. Ann. 6.31-33; D. C. 58.26.) Mithridates The aforesaid brother of Pharasmanes, was established on the throne of Armenia by the emperor Tiberius, A. D. 35. He was recalled to Rome by Caligula, but sent into Armenia again by Claudius, about A. D. 47, where he continued to reign, supported by the Romans, till he was expelled and put to death by his nephew Rhadamistus, A. D. 52. (Tac. Ann. 6.33, 9.8, 9, 12.44-47; D. C. 60.8.) Rhadamistus the son of Pharasmanes, king of Iberia, was a highly fitted but ambitious youth, whom his old father tied to get rid of by exciting him to invade Armenia, for which purpose he gave him an army. (A. D. 52.) Rhadamistus, seconded by the perfidy of the Roman praefect in Armenia, Pollio, succeeded in seiz
for Armenian kings were known to the Greeks long before the accession of the Arsacidae; and the annals of the Eastern empire mention many important transactions with kings of Armenia, belonging to those dynasties, which reigned in this country during a period of almost a thousand years after the fall of the Arsacidae. But as any detailed account would be out of place here, we can give only a short sketch. I. DYNASTY of HAÏG Founded by Haig, the son of Gathlas, who is said to have lived B. C. 2107. Fifty-nine kings belong to this dynasty, and among them Zarmair, who, according to the Armenian historians, assisted the Trojans at the siege of their city, where he commanded a body of Assyrians ; Dikran or Tigranes, a prince mentioned by Xenophon (Xen. Cyrop. 3.1, 5.1, 3, 8.3, 4) ; and Wahe, the last of his house, who fell in a battle with Alexander the Great in B. C. 328. The names of the fifty-nine kings, the duration of their reigns, and some other historical facts, mixed up with fab
es VI.--A. D. 198. Chosroes or Khosrew I., surnamed Medz, or the Great, the (fabulous) conqueror (overrunner) of Asia Minor; murdered by the Arsacid Anag, who was the father of St. Gregory, the apostle of Armenia.--A. D. 232. Ardashir or Artaxerxes, the first Sassanid of Persia.--A. D. 259. Dertad or Tiridates II., surnamed Medz, the son of Chosroes, established by the Romans.--A. D. 314. Interregnum. Sanadrug seizes northern Armenia, and Pagur southern Armenia, but only for a short time.--A. D. 316. Chosroes or Khosrew II., surnamed P'hok'hr, or " the Little," the son of Tiridates Mezd.--A. D. 325. Diran or Tiranus I., his son.--A. D. 341. Arsaces or Arshag III., his son. --A. D. 370. Bab or Para.--A. D. 377. Waraztad, usurper.--A. D. 382. Arsaces IV. (and Valarsaces or Wagharshag II., his brother).--A. D. 387. Armenia divided.--A. D. 389. Arsaces IV. dies. Cazavon in Roman Armenia, Chosroes or Khosrew III. in Persarmenia.--A. D. 392. Bahram Shapur (Sapor), the brother of Chosroes I
ers all Armenia; cedes Edessa and Mesopotamia to the Romans.--A. D. 78. Ardashes or Artaxes III. (Exedares or Axidares), the son of Sanadrug, established by Vologeses I., king of the Parthians.--A. D. 120. Ardawazt or Artavasdes IV., son of Ardashes III., reigns only some months.-- A. D. 121. Diran or Tiranus I., his brother.--A. D. 142. Dikran or Tigranes VI., driven out by Lucius (Martius) Verus, who puts Soaemus on the throne. --A. D. 178. Wagharsh or Vologeses, the son of Tigranes VI.--A. D. 198. Chosroes or Khosrew I., surnamed Medz, or the Great, the (fabulous) conqueror (overrunner) of Asia Minor; murdered by the Arsacid Anag, who was the father of St. Gregory, the apostle of Armenia.--A. D. 232. Ardashir or Artaxerxes, the first Sassanid of Persia.--A. D. 259. Dertad or Tiridates II., surnamed Medz, the son of Chosroes, established by the Romans.--A. D. 314. Interregnum. Sanadrug seizes northern Armenia, and Pagur southern Armenia, but only for a short time.--A. D. 316. Chosro
IX.] Vaillant thinks that he was the king seized upon by Caracalla. On the other hand, the Armenian historians tell us that Wagharsh, in Greek Vologeses or Valarsases, the son of Dikran (Tigranes), reigned over Armenia, or part of Armenia, from A. D. 178 to 198, and that he perished in a battle against the Khazars, near Derbent, in 198. It is of course impossible that he should have been seized by Caracalla, who sueceeded his father Septimius Severus in 211. Nor do the Armenians mention any kins.--A. D. 120. Ardawazt or Artavasdes IV., son of Ardashes III., reigns only some months.-- A. D. 121. Diran or Tiranus I., his brother.--A. D. 142. Dikran or Tigranes VI., driven out by Lucius (Martius) Verus, who puts Soaemus on the throne. --A. D. 178. Wagharsh or Vologeses, the son of Tigranes VI.--A. D. 198. Chosroes or Khosrew I., surnamed Medz, or the Great, the (fabulous) conqueror (overrunner) of Asia Minor; murdered by the Arsacid Anag, who was the father of St. Gregory, the apostle o
Armenia, and proclaim him king. Tiridates advanced upon Tigranocerta, took this city and Artaxata, and compelled Rhadamistus to fly. Rhadamistus was subsequently killed by his father Pharasmanes. (Tac. Ann. 12.44-51, 13.6, 37.) TIRIDATES I. The brother of Vologeses I., king of the Parthians, was driven out of Armenia by Corbulo, who appointed in his place Tigranes IV., the grandson of king Archelaus, A. D. 60. [TIGRANES IV.] Tiridates subsequently received the crown as a gift from Nero, A. D. 63. [ARSACES XXIII., TIRIDATES I.] Exedares (Ardashes Iii.) An Arsacid (of the younger Armenian branch), was driven out by Chosroes or Khosrew, king of the Parthians. (D. C. 68.17.) According to Moses Chorenensis (2.44-57), Exedares, who is called Ardashes III., was a mighty prince, who humbled the armies of Domitian, but was finally driven out by Trajan. Chosroes placed on the throne in his stead Parthamasiris, a Parthian prince. Exedares reigned during forty-two years, from A. D. 78 to 12
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