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nn (Gesch. Roms, iii. p. 128) conjectures, that she was the daughter of M. Aurelius Cotta and Rutilia Compp. Cic. Att. 12.20), and that C. M. and L. Cottae, who were consuls in B. C. 75, 74, and 65 respectively, were her brothers. She carefully watched over the education of her children (Dial. de Orat. 28; comp. D. C. 44.38), and always took a lively interest in the success of her son. She appears to have constantly lived with him; and Caesar on his part treated her with great affection and respect. Thus, it is said, that on the day when he was elected Pontifex Maximus, B. C. 63, he told his mother, as she kissed him upon his leaving his house in the morning to proceed to the comitia, that he would not return home except as Pontifex Maximus. (Suet. Jul. 13.) It was Aurelia who detected Clodius in the house of her son during the celebration of the mysteries of the Bona Dea in B. C. 62. (Plut. Caes. 9, 10; Suet. Jul. 74.) She died in B. C. 54, while her son was in Gaul. (Suet. Jul. 26.)
nn (Gesch. Roms, iii. p. 128) conjectures, that she was the daughter of M. Aurelius Cotta and Rutilia Compp. Cic. Att. 12.20), and that C. M. and L. Cottae, who were consuls in B. C. 75, 74, and 65 respectively, were her brothers. She carefully watched over the education of her children (Dial. de Orat. 28; comp. D. C. 44.38), and always took a lively interest in the success of her son. She appears to have constantly lived with him; and Caesar on his part treated her with great affection and respect. Thus, it is said, that on the day when he was elected Pontifex Maximus, B. C. 63, he told his mother, as she kissed him upon his leaving his house in the morning to proceed to the comitia, that he would not return home except as Pontifex Maximus. (Suet. Jul. 13.) It was Aurelia who detected Clodius in the house of her son during the celebration of the mysteries of the Bona Dea in B. C. 62. (Plut. Caes. 9, 10; Suet. Jul. 74.) She died in B. C. 54, while her son was in Gaul. (Suet. Jul. 26.)
nn (Gesch. Roms, iii. p. 128) conjectures, that she was the daughter of M. Aurelius Cotta and Rutilia Compp. Cic. Att. 12.20), and that C. M. and L. Cottae, who were consuls in B. C. 75, 74, and 65 respectively, were her brothers. She carefully watched over the education of her children (Dial. de Orat. 28; comp. D. C. 44.38), and always took a lively interest in the success of her son. She appears to have constantly lived with him; and Caesar on his part treated her with great affection and respect. Thus, it is said, that on the day when he was elected Pontifex Maximus, B. C. 63, he told his mother, as she kissed him upon his leaving his house in the morning to proceed to the comitia, that he would not return home except as Pontifex Maximus. (Suet. Jul. 13.) It was Aurelia who detected Clodius in the house of her son during the celebration of the mysteries of the Bona Dea in B. C. 62. (Plut. Caes. 9, 10; Suet. Jul. 74.) She died in B. C. 54, while her son was in Gaul. (Suet. Jul. 26.)
Aure'lia the wife of C. Julius Caesar, by whom she became the mother of C. Julius Caesar, the dictator, and of two daughters. It is doubtful who her parents were: Drumann (Gesch. Roms, iii. p. 128) conjectures, that she was the daughter of M. Aurelius Cotta and Rutilia Compp. Cic. Att. 12.20), and that C. M. and L. Cottae, who were consuls in B. C. 75, 74, and 65 respectively, were her brothers. She carefully watched over the education of her children (Dial. de Orat. 28; comp. D. C. 44.38), and always took a lively interest in the success of her son. She appears to have constantly lived with him; and Caesar on his part treated her with great affection and respect. Thus, it is said, that on the day when he was elected Pontifex Maximus, B. C. 63, he told his mother, as she kissed him upon his leaving his house in the morning to proceed to the comitia, that he would not return home except as Pontifex Maximus. (Suet. Jul. 13.) It was Aurelia who detected Clodius in the house of her son d