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Browsing named entities in a specific section of A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). Search the whole document.

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i/dhs), an Athenian comic poet of the old comedy, whom Suidas (s. v.) places at the head of the poets of the old comedy (prwtagwnisth\n th=s a)r*Xai/as kwmwdi/as), adding that he exhibited eight years before the Persian war, that is, in B. C. 487. (Clinton. sub ann.) On the other hand, according to a passage in the Poetics of Aristotle (100.3), Chionides was long after Epicharmus. [EPICHARMUS.] On the strength of this passage Meineke thinks that Chionides cannot be placed much earlier than B. C. 460; and in confirmation of this date he quotes from Athenaeus (xiv. p. 638a.) a passage from a play of Chionides, the *Ptw*Xoi/, in which mention is made of Gnesippus, a poet contemporary with Cratinus. But we also learn from Athenaeus (l.c. and iv. p. 137e.), that some of the ancient critics considered the *Ptwxoi/ to be spurious, and with respect to the passage of Aristotle, Ritter has brought forward very strong arguments against its genuineness. (For the discussion of the question see Wol
Chio'nides (*Xiwni/dhs and *Xioni/dhs), an Athenian comic poet of the old comedy, whom Suidas (s. v.) places at the head of the poets of the old comedy (prwtagwnisth\n th=s a)r*Xai/as kwmwdi/as), adding that he exhibited eight years before the Persian war, that is, in B. C. 487. (Clinton. sub ann.) On the other hand, according to a passage in the Poetics of Aristotle (100.3), Chionides was long after Epicharmus. [EPICHARMUS.] On the strength of this passage Meineke thinks that Chionides cannot be placed much earlier than B. C. 460; and in confirmation of this date he quotes from Athenaeus (xiv. p. 638a.) a passage from a play of Chionides, the *Ptw*Xoi/, in which mention is made of Gnesippus, a poet contemporary with Cratinus. But we also learn from Athenaeus (l.c. and iv. p. 137e.), that some of the ancient critics considered the *Ptwxoi/ to be spurious, and with respect to the passage of Aristotle, Ritter has brought forward very strong arguments against its genuineness. (For the d