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Browsing named entities in a specific section of A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). Search the whole document.

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Clei'nias (*Kleini/as.) 1. Son of Alcibiades, who traced his origin from Eurysaces, the son of the Telamonian Ajax. This Alcibiades was the contemporary of Cleisthenes [CLEISTHENES, No. 2], whom he assisted in expelling the Peisistratidae from Athens, and along with whom he was subsequently banished. Cleinias married Deinomacha, the daughter of Megacles, and became by her the father of the famous Alcibiades. He greatly distinguished himself in the third naval engagement at Artemisium, B. C. 480, having provided a ship and manned it with 200 men at his own expense. He was slain in B. C. 447, at the battle of Coroneia, in which the Athenians were defeated by the Boeotian and Euboean exiles. (Hdt. 8.17; Plut. Alc. 1; Plat. Alc. Prim. p. 112; Thuc. 1.113
Clei'nias (*Kleini/as.) 1. Son of Alcibiades, who traced his origin from Eurysaces, the son of the Telamonian Ajax. This Alcibiades was the contemporary of Cleisthenes [CLEISTHENES, No. 2], whom he assisted in expelling the Peisistratidae from Athens, and along with whom he was subsequently banished. Cleinias married Deinomacha, the daughter of Megacles, and became by her the father of the famous Alcibiades. He greatly distinguished himself in the third naval engagement at Artemisium, B. C. 480, having provided a ship and manned it with 200 men at his own expense. He was slain in B. C. 447, at the battle of Coroneia, in which the Athenians were defeated by the Boeotian and Euboean exiles. (Hdt. 8.17; Plut. Alc. 1; Plat. Alc. Prim. p. 112; Thuc. 1.113