hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
43 BC 170 170 Browse Search
44 BC 146 146 Browse Search
49 BC 140 140 Browse Search
45 BC 124 124 Browse Search
54 BC 121 121 Browse Search
46 BC 119 119 Browse Search
63 BC 109 109 Browse Search
48 BC 106 106 Browse Search
69 AD 95 95 Browse Search
59 BC 90 90 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). Search the whole document.

Found 4 total hits in 3 results.

altogether out of character with the moderation and good taste displayed in his other compositions. The chief evidence consists in certain expressions contained in chapters 22 and 23, where the speaker represents himself as a native of Autun, and, in the language of a man advanced in years, recommends to the patronage of the sovereign his five sons, one of whom is spoken of as discharging the duties of an office in the treasury. 4. Gratiarum actio Constantino Augusto Flaviensium nomine. The city of Autun having experienced the liberality of Constantine, who in consideration of their recent misfortunes had relieved the inhabitants from a heavy load of taxation, assumed in honour of its patron the appellation of Flavia, and deputed Eumenius to convey to the prince expressions of gratitude. This address was spoken at Treves in the year A. D. 311. Assessment For information with regard to the general merits and the editions of Eumenius and the other panegyrists, see DREPANIUS. [W.R]
minary, allowing him, however, to retain his post at court, and at the same time doubling his salary, which thus amounted to the large sum of 600,000 sesterces, or about 5000l. per annum. The principal, before entering on his duties, delivered (A. D. 296 or 297) the oration now before us, in the presenee of the praeses of Gallia Lugdunensis, in order that he might publicly acknowledge the liberality of the prince, might explain his own views as to the manner in which the objects in view could bport of the establishment. We find included (100.14) an interesting letter addressed by Constantius to Eumenius. 2. Panegyricus Constantino Caesari dictus. A congratulatory address upon the recovery of Britain, delivered towards the close of A. D. 296, or the beginning of 297. [ALLECTUS; CARAUSIUS.] 3. Panegyricus Constantino Augusto dictus This was pronounced at Treves, A. D. 310, on the birth-day of the city, in the presence of Constantine, containing an outline of the career of the emp
carrying these plans into effect without any tax upon the public, by devoting one-half of his allowance to the support of the establishment. We find included (100.14) an interesting letter addressed by Constantius to Eumenius. 2. Panegyricus Constantino Caesari dictus. A congratulatory address upon the recovery of Britain, delivered towards the close of A. D. 296, or the beginning of 297. [ALLECTUS; CARAUSIUS.] 3. Panegyricus Constantino Augusto dictus This was pronounced at Treves, A. D. 310, on the birth-day of the city, in the presence of Constantine, containing an outline of the career of the emperor, in which all his deeds are magniied in most outrageous hyperboles. Heyne is unwilling to believe that Eumenius is the author of this declamation, which he considers altogether out of character with the moderation and good taste displayed in his other compositions. The chief evidence consists in certain expressions contained in chapters 22 and 23, where the speaker represents h