hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
43 BC 170 170 Browse Search
44 BC 146 146 Browse Search
49 BC 140 140 Browse Search
45 BC 124 124 Browse Search
54 BC 121 121 Browse Search
46 BC 119 119 Browse Search
63 BC 109 109 Browse Search
48 BC 106 106 Browse Search
69 AD 95 95 Browse Search
59 BC 90 90 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). Search the whole document.

Found 5 total hits in 3 results.

Magne'ntius Roman emperor in the West, A. D. 350-353. FLAVIUS POPILIUS MAGNENTIUS, according to the accounts preserved by Victor and Zosimus, belonged to one of those German families who were transported across the Rhine, and established in Gaul, about the end of the third century; according to the statement of Julian, which is not irreconcilable with the former, he was a captive taken in war by Constantius Chlorus, or Constantine. Under the latter he served with reputation in many wars, rose and having associated himself with Marcellinus, chancellor of the imperial exchequer (comes sacrarum larqitionum), a plot was deliberately contrived and carefully matured. A great feast was given by Marcellinus at Autun on the 18th of January, A. D. 350, ostensibly to celebrate the birthday of his son, to which the chief officers of the army and the most distinguished of the court were invited. When the night was far spent, Magnentius, who had quitted the apartment under some pretext, suddenly
Magne'ntius Roman emperor in the West, A. D. 350-353. FLAVIUS POPILIUS MAGNENTIUS, according to the accounts preserved by Victor and Zosimus, belonged to one of those German families who were transported across the Rhine, and established in Gaul, about the end of the third century; according to the statement of Julian, which is not irreconcilable with the former, he was a captive taken in war by Constantius Chlorus, or Constantine. Under the latter he served with reputation in many wars, rose of Mursa on the Drave, in the autumn of A. D. 351, followed by the loss of Italy, Sicily, Africa, and Spain--his second defeat in the passes of the Cottian Alps--the defection of Gaul--and his death by his own hands about the middle of August, A. D. 353, are fully detailed in other articles. [CONSTANTIUS, p. 847; DECENTIUS, DESIDERIUS, NEPOTIANUS, VETRANIO.] Magnentius was a man of commanding stature great bodily strength, was well educated, and accomplished, fond of literature, an animated
s was quickly conveyed to Constantius, who hurried from the frontier of Persia to vindicate the honour of his house, by crushing this double rebellion. The events which followed-the fruitless attempts of the two pretenders to negotiate a peace-the submission of Vetranio at Sardica-the distress of Constantius in Pannonia, which induced him in his turn, but fruitlessly, to make overtures to his opponent-the defeat of Magnentius at the sanguinary battle of Mursa on the Drave, in the autumn of A. D. 351, followed by the loss of Italy, Sicily, Africa, and Spain--his second defeat in the passes of the Cottian Alps--the defection of Gaul--and his death by his own hands about the middle of August, A. D. 353, are fully detailed in other articles. [CONSTANTIUS, p. 847; DECENTIUS, DESIDERIUS, NEPOTIANUS, VETRANIO.] Magnentius was a man of commanding stature great bodily strength, was well educated, and accomplished, fond of literature, an animated and impressive speaker, a bold soldier, and a