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ut the court, he was ordered to retire to the monastery, apparently that of Euprepius, in the suburbs of Antioch, in which he had dwelt before his election to the patriarchate. Here he remained four years, being treated, according to his own statement (apud Evagr. H. E. 1.7), with kindness and respect. As, however, he persisted in maintaining his opinions, or as his opponents called it, his blasphemy, he was sentenced to perpetual banishment in the Greater Oasis in Upper Egypt, probably in A. D. 435; at the instigation of his former supporter, John of Antioch [Joannes, No. 9], who was aggravated by his persistence, and by that of a few of the bishops who adhered to him. [Meletius, No. 7.] In this remote and painful exile, his spirit remained unbroken. He wrote a work, addressed to some Egyptian, on the subject of his wrongs, and addressed various memorials to the governor of the Thebaid. After an interval of uncertain length, he was carried off by the Blemmyes, who ravaged the Oasis w
dy; and which is probably the work mentioned by Evagrius (H. E. 1.7), as addressed, in the form of a dialogue, to a certain Egyptian. It is mentioned by Ebedjesu the Syrian, in a catalogue of works ascribed to Nestorius. Liber Heraclidis Of the Liber Heraclidis, mentioned also by Ebedjesu, nothing seems to be known. Liturgy A Syriac Liturgy, ascribed to Nestorius, is mentioned by Ebedjesu, and is extant. Editions It was pu,lished in the original, with several similar works at Rome A. D. 1592; and is given in a Latin version in the Liturgiae Orientales of Eusebius Renaudot, vol. ii. p. 626. 4to. Paris, 1716. Memorial of Nestorius A memorial of Nestorius, on his sufferings, is also cited by Evagrius H. E. 1.7). Works conjecturally ascribed to Nestorius The following works are conjecturally ascribed to him : -- 1. Two Homiliae De Resurrectione et Ascessione Christi Two Homiliae De Resurrectione et Ascessione Christi, which Combéfis, in his Auctarium Norum, had ascribed t
him, and he returned to the Thebaid. But the vindictiveness of his enemies was not satisfied : he was harshly hurried from one place of confinement to another, and at last died miserably from the effects of a fall. The story of his dying disease, in which his tongue was eaten by worms, which Evagrius had read in a certain work, was probably an invention springing from the mistaken notion that, in the retributive judgment of God, the member which had sinned should bear the he was living in A. D. 439, when Socrates wrote his history (Socrat. H. E. 7.34), and probably died before A. D. 450. His death did not abate the bitterness of his enemies; Evagrius records, with apparent satisfaction (H. E. 1.7, ad fin.), that he passed from the sufferings of this world to sharper and more enduring woe in the world to come. It is impossible either to deny or justify the violent treatment of Nestorius by the council of Ephesus. Neither can we, without compassion, read his touching appeal to his pe
ed with general approval. He was consecrated 10th April 428, according to the authority of Socrates. Liberatus places his consecration on the 1st of April (Breviar. cap. 4) which Le Quien (Oriens Christian., vol. i. col. 215) observes to be more consistent with the usage of the Constantinopolitan Church, as it coincided that year with Sunday, on which day the patriarchs were usually consecrated. Theophanes places the appointment of Nestorius in A. M. 5923, Alex. era, which corresponds with A. D. 430 or 431; but his chronology is by no means accurate in this part of his work. Nestorius was consecrated rather more than three months after the death of his predecessor Sisinnius. He gave immediately on his appointment an indication of the violent and intolerant course which he afterwards pursued. He thus publicly addressed the emperor Theodosius the Younger (Socrat. H. E. 7.29): "Purge the earth, sire, of heretics for me, and I will in return bestow heaven on you. Join me in putting away
ied : he was harshly hurried from one place of confinement to another, and at last died miserably from the effects of a fall. The story of his dying disease, in which his tongue was eaten by worms, which Evagrius had read in a certain work, was probably an invention springing from the mistaken notion that, in the retributive judgment of God, the member which had sinned should bear the he was living in A. D. 439, when Socrates wrote his history (Socrat. H. E. 7.34), and probably died before A. D. 450. His death did not abate the bitterness of his enemies; Evagrius records, with apparent satisfaction (H. E. 1.7, ad fin.), that he passed from the sufferings of this world to sharper and more enduring woe in the world to come. It is impossible either to deny or justify the violent treatment of Nestorius by the council of Ephesus. Neither can we, without compassion, read his touching appeal to his persecutors (apud Evagr. ibid.), that his past sufferings might be counted sufficient. But o
rist" (Epistol. Nestorii ad Joan. apud Concil. vol. i. col. 1331; comp. Evagr. H. E. 1.7). The expedient was unobjectionable; but the violence of its proposer would have prevented peace, even had the temper of the factions and the times been more peaceloving and moderate. A general council was now inevitable; and an edict of the emperors Theodosius and Valentinian III. appointed it to be held at Ephesus. Nestorius, prompt and fearless, arrived with a crowd of followers soon after Easter (A. D. 431). Cyril, who, beside his own dignity, was appointed temporarily to represent Coelestine, arrived about Pentecost: and the session of the council commenced, although John of Antioch, and the bishops of his patriarchate had not yet arrived. Cyril and Nestorius had a sharp encounter, Cyril seeking by terror to break the resolution of his opponent, Nestorius undauntedly replying, and then withdrawing with the bishops of his party, declaring that he would not return to the council until the arr