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involves some difficulties; he states that, when the Cythereans were reduced to slavery by the Lacedaemonians, Philoxenus was bought by a certainly Agesylas, by whom he was brought up, and was called *Mu/rmhc : and that, after the death of Agesylas, he was bought by the lyric poet Melanippides, by whom he was also educated. Now there is no record of the Lacedaemonians having reduced the Cythereans to slavery; but we know that the island was seized by an Athenian expedition under Nicias, in B. C. 424 (Thuc. 4.53, 54; Diod. 12.65; Plut. Nic. 6); and therefore some critics propose to read *)Aqhnai/wn for *Lakedaimoni/wn(Meineke, Fragm. Com. Graec. vol. iv. p. 635). This solution is not quite satisfactory, and another, of much ingenuity, is proposed by Schmlidt (Dithyramb. pp. 5. 6); but it is not worth while here to discuss the question further, since the only important part of the statement, namely, that Philoxenus was really a slave in his youth, is quite sustained by other testimonies
n used for the names of slaves. Others, however, suppose the name to have been a nicknamne given to him by the comic poets, to express the intricacy of his musical strains, the e'ktrape/lous murmhkia/s, as Pherecrates calls them (see below). He was educated, says Suidas, by Melanippides, of course in that poet's own profession, that of dithyrambic poetry, in which, if the above interpretation of the allusion in the Frogs be correct, he had already attained to considerable eminence before B. C. 408; which agrees very well with the statement of Diodorus (i. c.), according to which he was at the height of his fame seven years later. Pherecrates also attacked him in his Cheiron, as one of the corruptors of music; at least Plutarch applies to him a part of the passage; and if this application be correct, we have another allusion to his name *Mu/rmhc, in the mention of e'ktrape/lous murmhkia/s ( Pllt. de Mus. 30, p. 1146, as explained and corrected by Meineke, Frug. Com Graec. vol. ii. pp
oned by name, there are passages which are, to all appearance, parodies upon his poem entitled *Dei=pnon (Fr. xii. xiii. ed. Bergk, ap. Meineke, Frag. Com. Graec. vol. ii. pp. 1009, 1010). In the Ecclesiazusae also, B. C. 392, there is a passage which is almost certainly a similar parody (vv. 1167-1178; Bergk, Comment. de Reliq. Comoed. Att. Antiq. p. 212). There is also a long passage in the Phaon of the comic poet Plato, which seems to have been acted in the year after the Ecclesiazusae, B. C. 391, professing to be read from a book, which the person who has it calls *Filoce/nou kainh/ tis o'yartusi/a which is almost certainly a pairody on tice same poem, although Athenaeus and some modern critics suppose the allusion to be to a poem by Philoxenus, the Leucadian, on the art of cookery. It is true that the latter was known for his fondness of luxurious living; but the coincidence would be too remarkable, and the confusion between the two Philoxeni utterly hopeless, if we were to suppo
6, as explained and corrected by Meineke, Frug. Com Graec. vol. ii. pp. 326-335). In the Daitales of Aristophanes, which was also on the prevalent corruptions of poetry and music, and which seems to have been acted some little time after the Frogs, though Philoxenus is not mentioned by name, there are passages which are, to all appearance, parodies upon his poem entitled *Dei=pnon (Fr. xii. xiii. ed. Bergk, ap. Meineke, Frag. Com. Graec. vol. ii. pp. 1009, 1010). In the Ecclesiazusae also, B. C. 392, there is a passage which is almost certainly a similar parody (vv. 1167-1178; Bergk, Comment. de Reliq. Comoed. Att. Antiq. p. 212). There is also a long passage in the Phaon of the comic poet Plato, which seems to have been acted in the year after the Ecclesiazusae, B. C. 391, professing to be read from a book, which the person who has it calls *Filoce/nou kainh/ tis o'yartusi/a which is almost certainly a pairody on tice same poem, although Athenaeus and some modern critics suppose the
of the scholiast. who, seeing in the text of Aristophanes a joke on the voracity of the dithyrambic poets of his day, and having read of the gluttony of Philoxenus of Leucadia, identified the latter with Philoxenus the dithyrambic poet, and therefore supposed him to be referred to by Aristophanes. At what time Philoxenus left Athens and went to Sicily, cannot be determined. Schmidt (p. 15) supposes that he went as a colonist, after the first victories of Dionysius over the Carthaginians, B. C. 396; that he speedily obtained the favour of Dionysius, and took up his abode at his court at Syracuse, the luxury of which furnished him with the theme of his poem entitled *Dei=pnon. However this may be, we know that he soon offended Dionysius, and was cast into prison; an act of oppression which most writers ascribe to the wounded vanity of the tyrant, whose poems Philoxenus not only refused to praise, but, on being asked to revise one of them, said that the best way of correcting it would
Philo'xenus 1. Philoxenus, the son of Euletidas, was a native of Cythera, or, as others said, of Heracleia on the Pontus (Suid. s. v.); but the former account is no doubt the correct one. We learn from the Parian Marble (No. 70) that he died in Ol. 100. B. C. 380, at the age of 55; he was, therefore, born in Ol. 86. 2, B. C. 435. The time when he most flourished was, according to Diodorus (14.46), in Ol. 95. 2, .100.398. The brief account of his life in Suidas involves some difficulties; he states that, when the Cythereans were reduced to slavery by the Lacedaemonians, Philoxenus was bought by a certainly Agesylas, by whom he was brought up, and was called *Mu/rmhc : and that, after the death of Agesylas, he was bought by the lyric poet Melanippides, by whom he was also educated. Now there is no record of the Lacedaemonians having reduced the Cythereans to slavery; but we know that the island was seized by an Athenian expedition under Nicias, in B. C. 424 (Thuc. 4.53, 54; Diod. 12
Philo'xenus 1. Philoxenus, the son of Euletidas, was a native of Cythera, or, as others said, of Heracleia on the Pontus (Suid. s. v.); but the former account is no doubt the correct one. We learn from the Parian Marble (No. 70) that he died in Ol. 100. B. C. 380, at the age of 55; he was, therefore, born in Ol. 86. 2, B. C. 435. The time when he most flourished was, according to Diodorus (14.46), in Ol. 95. 2, .100.398. The brief account of his life in Suidas involves some difficulties; he states that, when the Cythereans were reduced to slavery by the Lacedaemonians, Philoxenus was bought by a certainly Agesylas, by whom he was brought up, and was called *Mu/rmhc : and that, after the death of Agesylas, he was bought by the lyric poet Melanippides, by whom he was also educated. Now there is no record of the Lacedaemonians having reduced the Cythereans to slavery; but we know that the island was seized by an Athenian expedition under Nicias, in B. C. 424 (Thuc. 4.53, 54; Diod. 12