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zeal of these youths. They had between them but one change of raiment (i(ma/tion kai\ tribw/nion), and three thin, faded blankets (strw/mata). When Proaeresius went forth to the public schools, his friend lay in bed working his exercises, and this they did alternately. Proaeresius soon acquired a high place in his master's esteem, of which, as well as his own merit, a singular proof is given by Eunapius (ibid. p. 71,&c.). On the death of Julian (according to Clinton, Fast. Rom. p. 401, in A. D. 340), who left Proaeresius his house (Eunap. ibid. p. 69), it was determined no longer to confine the chair of rhetoric to one, but to extend this honour to many. (Eunap. ibid. p. 79.) Epiphanius, Diophantus, Sopolis, Parnasius, and Hephaestion were chosen from among a crowd of competitors; but Hephaestion left Athens, dreading competition with Proaeresius. The students, generally, betook themselves to their professors, according to their nations; and there attached themselves to Proaeresius t
he was highly esteemed, and having written or delivered a eulogy on the city, was honoured in return with a life-size statue of bronze, bearing this inscription, "The Queen of Cities to the Prince of Eloquence." On his departure from Rome, he obtained for Athens a tributary supply of provisions from several islands -- a grant which was confirmed by the eparch of Athens at the solicitation of Anatolius--and he himself was honoured with the title of stratopeda/rxhs. When the emperor Julian (A. D. 362) had promulgated the decree, for which he is so strongly censured, even by his eulogist Ammianus Marcellinus (20.10, 25.4), forbidding teachers belonging to the Christian religion to practise their art, we are told (Hieron. in Chronic.. An. 2378), that Proaeresius was expressly exempted from its operation, but that he refused any immunity not enjoyed by his brethren. To this partial suspension of his rhetorical functions, Eunapius also alludes, but, distracted by his love of the man, and h
Proae'resius (*Proaire/sios), distinguished teacher of rhetoric, was a native of Armenia, born about A. D. 276, of good connections, though poor. He came to Antioch to study under the rhetorician Ulpian. Having soon risen to high distinction in his school, he removed to Athens, where he placed himself under Julian, then seated in the chair of rhetoric. There came along with him from Antioch his friend Hephaestion. A fact told by Eunapius in his life of Proaeresius (Vit. Soph. vol. i. p. 73, ed. Boissonade), illustrates both the poverty and the zeal of these youths. They had between them but one change of raiment (i(ma/tion kai\ tribw/nion), and three thin, faded blankets (strw/mata). When Proaeresius went forth to the public schools, his friend lay in bed working his exercises, and this they did alternately. Proaeresius soon acquired a high place in his master's esteem, of which, as well as his own merit, a singular proof is given by Eunapius (ibid. p. 71,&c.). On the death of Julian