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thorities state that Severus was compelled through the interference of Pope Agapetus (A. D. 535, 536) to leave Constantinople and return to Alexandria. The date of his death is uncertain : Joannes, bishop of Tela, his contemporary, in his Liber Directionum (apud Assemani, Biblioth. Orient. vol. ii. p. 54) places it in the year of the Greeks, i. e. the Seleucidae, 849 = A. D. 538; the Chronicon of Gregorius Bar Hebraeus, or Abulpharagius (apud eundem, p. 321), in the year of the Greeks 850= A. D. 539; and Assemani himself (ibid. note), in A. D. 542. It is said to have taken place at Alexandria, where he lurked in the disguise of a monk. The Jacobites recognize Sergius as his successor in the patriarchate. (Marcellinus, Chronicon Victor Tunnunensis, Chronicon ; Theophanes, Chronog. pp. 130-142. ed. Paris, pp. 104-113, ed. Venice, pp. 233-255, ed. Bonn; Evagrius, H. E. ll. cc.; Concilia, ll. cc.; Liberatus, Brexiarium Caussae Nestorianorum et Eutychianorum, 100.19; Nicephorus Callisti H
h the interference of Pope Agapetus (A. D. 535, 536) to leave Constantinople and return to Alexandria. The date of his death is uncertain : Joannes, bishop of Tela, his contemporary, in his Liber Directionum (apud Assemani, Biblioth. Orient. vol. ii. p. 54) places it in the year of the Greeks, i. e. the Seleucidae, 849 = A. D. 538; the Chronicon of Gregorius Bar Hebraeus, or Abulpharagius (apud eundem, p. 321), in the year of the Greeks 850= A. D. 539; and Assemani himself (ibid. note), in A. D. 542. It is said to have taken place at Alexandria, where he lurked in the disguise of a monk. The Jacobites recognize Sergius as his successor in the patriarchate. (Marcellinus, Chronicon Victor Tunnunensis, Chronicon ; Theophanes, Chronog. pp. 130-142. ed. Paris, pp. 104-113, ed. Venice, pp. 233-255, ed. Bonn; Evagrius, H. E. ll. cc.; Concilia, ll. cc.; Liberatus, Brexiarium Caussae Nestorianorum et Eutychianorum, 100.19; Nicephorus Callisti H. E. lib. 16.29-32, 34, 45, 17.2, 8, 9, 18.45, 49
I.], that emperor, at the instigation perhaps of Vitalian, commanded that Severus should be deposed and apprehended : according to some accounts he ordered his tongue to be cut out, and he was anathematized in a council held at Constantinople (A. D. 518). Severus, however, eluded the emperor's severity; and taking ship at Seleuceia, the port of Antioch, fled with Julian bishop of Halicarnassus, to Alexandria (A. D. 518 or 519). Paul was chosen patriarch of Antioch in his room (Evagrius, H. E. A. D. 518 or 519). Paul was chosen patriarch of Antioch in his room (Evagrius, H. E. 4.4) : and the change was followed by the secession from the church of the followers of the deposed patriarch, and by the pronouncing, in various ecclesiastical councils, of anathemas upon him (Concilia, vol. iv. col. 1673 ; Liberat. Breriar. 100.19). Meanwhile Severus remained at Alexandria, protected by the patriarch Timotheus : and, as if it was his destiny to be the troubler of the Church, he and his fellow-exile Julian started the controversy on the corruptibility of Christ's human body be
fauc. Bibl. Coislin. p. 54). Montfaucon published (Biblioth. Coislin. p. 63), under the name of Severus, and under the impression that it had never before been printed, a fragment, which he entitled Severi Archiepiscopi Antiocheni Concordantia Exangelistarum, circa ea quae in Sepulcro Domini contigerunt : item de Sabbatis et de Varietate Exemplarium S. Marci Exangelistae : but the fragment has been identified with a piece previously published among the works of Gregory of Nyssa, ed. Paris, A. D. 1615 and 1638 [GREGORIUS NYSSENUS], to whom, however, it does not belong; and A. D. 1648, again in the Auctarium Norum of Combéfis, by whom it was more correctly ascribed to Hesychius of Jerusalem [HESYCHIUS, No. 7]. How the piece came to be ascribed to Severus is discussed by Galland in the Prolegomena (100.3) to vol. xi. of his Bibliotheca Patrum, in which the piece is reprinted. An extract from a work of Severus is given under the title of *)Apo/krisis, Responsum, to the question, *Pw=s noht
the name of Severus, and under the impression that it had never before been printed, a fragment, which he entitled Severi Archiepiscopi Antiocheni Concordantia Exangelistarum, circa ea quae in Sepulcro Domini contigerunt : item de Sabbatis et de Varietate Exemplarium S. Marci Exangelistae : but the fragment has been identified with a piece previously published among the works of Gregory of Nyssa, ed. Paris, A. D. 1615 and 1638 [GREGORIUS NYSSENUS], to whom, however, it does not belong; and A. D. 1648, again in the Auctarium Norum of Combéfis, by whom it was more correctly ascribed to Hesychius of Jerusalem [HESYCHIUS, No. 7]. How the piece came to be ascribed to Severus is discussed by Galland in the Prolegomena (100.3) to vol. xi. of his Bibliotheca Patrum, in which the piece is reprinted. An extract from a work of Severus is given under the title of *)Apo/krisis, Responsum, to the question, *Pw=s nohte/on th\n tou= *Kuri/on trih/meron tafh\n kai) a)na/stasin; Quomodo sit intelligenda
n what year Severus went to Constantinople, or how long he abode there, is not clear. Tillemont places his arrival in A. D. 510; but he probably relied on a passage in Theophanes (Chronoy. ad A. M. 6002) which is ambiguous. The fellow-monks for whom Severus came to plead, were partisans of Peter Mongus [PETRUS, No. 22.]; and Severus, because he had formerly anathematized Peter, was reproached with inconsistency in taking their part (Liberat l.c.). He appears to have been at Constantinople, A. D. 512; when, in consequence of the disturbances, excited on account of Flavian, patriarch of Antioch [FLAVIANUS, Ecclesiastics, No. 2.], that prelate was deposed and banished to Petra in Idumaea (Evagr. H. E. 3.32), and Anastasius eagerly seized the opportunity afforded by this vacancy to procure the appointment of Severus to the patriarchate. The appointment was most offensive to the orthodox party. Whether Anastasius or Severus took any steps to abate its offensiveness is not clear. A letter o
ssion to return to Constantinople (Evagrius. l.c.). On his arrival, Severus found that Anthimus, who had just obtained the patriarchate of Constantinople, A. D. 535, was a Monophysite, and he prevailed on him to avow his sentiments. Timotheus of Alexandria was a Monophysite also, and the avowal of that obnoxious heresy by the heads of the church, naturally excited the alarm of the orthodox party. Anthimus and Timotheus were both deposed; and in the councils of Constantinople and Jerusalem (A. D. 536), and in an imperial edict, Severus was again anathematized ; his writings also were ordered to be burned. These decisive measures secured the predominance of the orthodox : and Evagrius boasts that the church remained from thenceforth united and pure. But this result was obtained by the separation of Monophysites, and the formation of the great Jacobite schismatical churches of Egypt and the East, by whom Severus has been ever regarded as, to his death, legitimate patriarch of Antioch. So
estine, and before entering that of Nephalius, the expression " in his adversity " intimates that he had been diven from his monastery in Palestine : but it is not unlikely that the disturbances at Alexandria may have been consequent on his expulsion and that of his fellow-monks by Nephalius ; and the term "his adversity" may be understood as referring to that expulsion. In what year Severus went to Constantinople, or how long he abode there, is not clear. Tillemont places his arrival in A. D. 510; but he probably relied on a passage in Theophanes (Chronoy. ad A. M. 6002) which is ambiguous. The fellow-monks for whom Severus came to plead, were partisans of Peter Mongus [PETRUS, No. 22.]; and Severus, because he had formerly anathematized Peter, was reproached with inconsistency in taking their part (Liberat l.c.). He appears to have been at Constantinople, A. D. 512; when, in consequence of the disturbances, excited on account of Flavian, patriarch of Antioch [FLAVIANUS, Ecclesiast
ned to the side of Severus. After the death of Justin, and the accession of Justinian I., the prospects of Severus became more favourable ; for although the new emperor himself [JUSTINIANUS I.] supported the Council of Chalcedon, his empress Theodora favoured the Monophysite party, and by her influence Severus obtained the emperor's permission to return to Constantinople (Evagrius. l.c.). On his arrival, Severus found that Anthimus, who had just obtained the patriarchate of Constantinople, A. D. 535, was a Monophysite, and he prevailed on him to avow his sentiments. Timotheus of Alexandria was a Monophysite also, and the avowal of that obnoxious heresy by the heads of the church, naturally excited the alarm of the orthodox party. Anthimus and Timotheus were both deposed; and in the councils of Constantinople and Jerusalem (A. D. 536), and in an imperial edict, Severus was again anathematized ; his writings also were ordered to be burned. These decisive measures secured the predominanc
ltra opinions had rendered him a dangerous or a disagreeable inmate of his Palestinian monastery and he hoped to find a more cordial welcome or a securer shelter with Nephalius. In this hope he was disappointed : Nephalius embraced the side of Council of Chalcedon, and Severus and others were expelled from the monastery (Evagr. l.c.). Hereupon he fled to Constantinople, to plead his own cause and that of his fellow-sufferers; and in this way became known to the emperor Anastasius, who had (A. D. 491) succeeded Zeno. Severus is charged (Libellus Monachor. l.c.) with exciting troubles in the city of Alexandria, and occasioning the burning of many houses and the slaughter of many citizens, though the city had afforded him a shelter " in his adversity :" but it is difficult to fix the time to which these charges refer. If he was in Alexandria after leaving the monastery in Palestine, and before entering that of Nephalius, the expression " in his adversity " intimates that he had been dive
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