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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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s was held motionless by its delay. Having recounted thus far the events of these days, let us recur briefly to General Johnston's personal movements. He left Corinth on the morning of the 4th, and arrived at Monterey at 1 P. M. Soon after, Clanton's Alabama Cavalry brought in some Federal prisoners; and it was manifest from their surprise and their conversation with the staff that the Confederate attack was wholly unexpected. During the afternoon, General Johnston conferred with Braggs right wing. Jackson's brigade, 2,208 strong, was drawn up three hundred yards in rear of Gladden, its left on the Bark road. Chalmers's brigade was on Jackson's right, en echelon to Gladden's brigade, with its right on a fork of Lick Creek. Clanton's cavalry was in rear of Chalmers's, with pickets to the right and front. In this order the division bivouacked. General Bragg's left wing was made up of three brigades, under General D. Ruggles. Colonel R. L. Gibson commanded the right bri
Thomas Worthington (search for this): chapter 37
ts to it as proof of cowardice in certain officers with whom he was at variance. He swears in his evidence on Worthington's trial. Sherman's historical raid, by Boynton, p. 29. Therefore, on Friday, two days before the battle, when Colonel Worthington was so apprehensive, I knew there was no hostile party in six miles, Hardee was not more than two miles distant. though there was reason to expect an attack. I suppose Colonel McDowell and myself had become tired of his constant prognoor weeks and months we had heard all sorts of reports, just as we do now. For weeks old women had reported that Beauregard was coming, sometimes with 100,000, sometimes with 800,000, when, in fact, he did not leave Corinth until after even Colonel Worthington had been alarmed for safety. Sherman says, further on, that, after the reconnaissance on Friday afternoon- We knew that we had the elements of an army in our front, but did not know its strength or destination. The guard was stre
Bushrod R. Johnson (search for this): chapter 37
Polk's command was massed in columns of brigades on the Bark road, near Mickey's; and Breckinridge's on the road from Monterey toward the same point. Polk was to advance on the left of the Bark road, at an interval of about eight hundred paces from Bragg's line; and Breckinridge, to the right of that road, was to give support, wherever it should become necessary. Polk's corps, 9,136 strong in infantry and artillery, was composed of two divisions, Cheatham's on the left, made up of B. R. Johnson's and Stephens's brigades, and Clark's on his right, formed of A. P. Stewart's and Russell's brigades. It followed Bragg's line at about eight hundred yards' distance. Breckinridge's reserve was composed of Trabue's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, with a total infantry and artillery of 6,439. The cavalry, about 4,300 strong, guarded the flanks, or was detached on outpost duty; but, both from the newness and imperfections of their organization, equipment, and drill, and from th
nridge's on the road from Monterey toward the same point. Polk was to advance on the left of the Bark road, at an interval of about eight hundred paces from Bragg's line; and Breckinridge, to the right of that road, was to give support, wherever it should become necessary. Polk's corps, 9,136 strong in infantry and artillery, was composed of two divisions, Cheatham's on the left, made up of B. R. Johnson's and Stephens's brigades, and Clark's on his right, formed of A. P. Stewart's and Russell's brigades. It followed Bragg's line at about eight hundred yards' distance. Breckinridge's reserve was composed of Trabue's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, with a total infantry and artillery of 6,439. The cavalry, about 4,300 strong, guarded the flanks, or was detached on outpost duty; but, both from the newness and imperfections of their organization, equipment, and drill, and from the rough and wooded character of the ground, they did little service that day. The part taken b
unexpected, and their own words show that a thunderbolt from a clear sky could not have astonished them more than the boom of artillery on Sunday morning. In Badeau's Life of Grant (page 600) occurs the following correspondence. The first communication is a telegram from General Grant to General Halleck, his commanding officer: Savannah, April 5, 1862. The main force of the enemy is at Corinth, with troops at different points east. Small garrisons are also at Bethel, Jackson, and Humboldt. The number at these places seems constantly to change. The number of the enemy at Corinth, and in supporting distance of it, cannot be far from 80,000 men. Information, obtained through deserters, places their force west at 200,000. One division of Buell's column arrived yesterday. General Buell will be here himself to-day. Some skirmishing took place between our out-guards and the enemy's yesterday and the day before. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Major-General H. W. Halleck, St. Lou
rps, commanded by Polk, consisted of two divisions, under Cheatham and Clark. Clark's division was ordered to follow Hardee reserve the right wing. Polk's other division, under Cheatham, was on outpost duty, at and near Bethel on the Mobile & rom Mickey's, the point of concentration, as Corinth was. Cheatham's orders were to defend himself if attacked; otherwise, toper military precautions. Acting on these instructions, Cheatham did not advance until the morning of the 5th; but he effeClark's division into line of battle by four o'clock, and Cheatham, who had come up on the left, soon after. Breckinridge'ser causes already assigned-Breckinridge's, Ruggles's, and Cheatham's-General Johnston, followed by his staff, passed from onin infantry and artillery, was composed of two divisions, Cheatham's on the left, made up of B. R. Johnson's and Stephens's road, with intervals of some two miles, in observation of Cheatham's division, which he believed to be still at Purdy. The
E. L. Drake (search for this): chapter 37
r arms, to be ready to advance. There they stood, anxious to go forward; but it was impossible to move in the pitch-darkness, over flooded roads and swollen streams, with the cold, driving rain beating upon them. With almost criminal recklessness, many of the soldiers discharged their small-arms, to find out the condition of the cartridges. General Johnston, as he rode along the lines on the 5th, tried to prevent the recurrence of this. Bragg alludes to it with great severity. Colonel E. L. Drake, of Fayetteville, Tennessee, who was at that time serving in Bate's Second Tennessee Regiment, of which he has furnished a valuable memoir to the writer, gives the following statement. His regiment was in Cleburne's brigade, and on the extreme left of Hardee's line. He says: The wishes of General Johnston to move quietly were not generally regarded; and, at one point on the march, the presence of a wild deer, which ran along the lines, evoked a yell among Hardee's men which co
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 37
n of battle. strength of Federal position. Beauregard's report. Bragg's sketch of preliminaries. ops. address to army. the Council of War. Beauregard for retreat. Johnston's decision, and reaso seems-after they had been elaborated by General Beauregard. When it became apparent that the or came up and asked what was the matter. General Beauregard repeated what he had said to me. Generalhe meeting was, as stated by Bragg, casual. Beauregard sent for Polk. The discussion between them nference was held between Generals Johnston, Beauregard, Bragg, and Polk, at 5 P. M.; Major Gilmer bthat I knew that such was the feeling of General Beauregard, and he seemed wonderfully depressed in to lead the attack in person, and leave General Beauregard to direct the movements of troops in theys he made up from the returns at the time. Beauregard's report of the battle gives the field returtold him I had met and fought the advance of Beauregard's army, that he was advancing on us. General[19 more...]
William Nelson (search for this): chapter 37
d. It is but a poor compliment to the generalship of either Grant or Sherman to believe them aware of the presence of the Confederate army in their front on the 5th. Else why was General Lew Wallace with 7,500 men kept at Crump's Landing, and Nelson and Crittenden's divisions-14,000 men-left at Savannah? Why the calm of Saturday and the confusion of Sunday? For the events of the battle, let the eulogists of Generals Grant and Sherman rather plead, than deny, the surprise that befell them ove or six miles distant, with one brigade at Crump's Landing, and the other two on the Adamsville road, with intervals of some two miles, in observation of Cheatham's division, which he believed to be still at Purdy. The advance of Buell's army, Nelson's division, had passed through Savannah on Saturday morning, April 5th, and was distant from Pittsburg about five miles on the north bank of the river. Crittenden's division arrived there on the morning of the 6th, and the other divisions of Bue
John S. Bowen (search for this): chapter 37
hundred paces from Bragg's line; and Breckinridge, to the right of that road, was to give support, wherever it should become necessary. Polk's corps, 9,136 strong in infantry and artillery, was composed of two divisions, Cheatham's on the left, made up of B. R. Johnson's and Stephens's brigades, and Clark's on his right, formed of A. P. Stewart's and Russell's brigades. It followed Bragg's line at about eight hundred yards' distance. Breckinridge's reserve was composed of Trabue's, Bowen's, and Statham's brigades, with a total infantry and artillery of 6,439. The cavalry, about 4,300 strong, guarded the flanks, or was detached on outpost duty; but, both from the newness and imperfections of their organization, equipment, and drill, and from the rough and wooded character of the ground, they did little service that day. The part taken by Morgan's, Forrest's, and Wharton's (Eighth Texas), will be given in its proper place. The army, exclusive of its cavalry, was betwee
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