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ssed the river, and were cheering in consequence Fearful that other forces would move down from Drainsville, and cut off his communication, Evans once more fell back to Goose Creek, where a South-Carolina regiment, a Louisiana regiment, and four guns of the Washington Artillery, reenforced us. Here we anxiously awaited battle from McCall, or any one else who dared to approach. Our reenforcements were eager for the strife, and could a hundred thousand dollars have purchased a battle, they would willingly have subscribed that amount. The Louisianians in particular were fretful for a fight; they had marched from Centreville in a very short time, and in order not to delay, kicked over their barrels of flour, and journeyed with empty haversacks. This regiment was entirely composed of Creoles and Irish--a splendid lot of men, and highly disciplined by Colonel Kelly. They have since greatly distinguished themselves in Stonewall Jackson's division, having turned the tide in many battles.
N. P. Banks (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 11: What the enemy did when our forces had left Leesburgh Plots of Union traitors during our absence threatened approach of the enemy from Drainsville upon our right flank we march out to the attack, Sunday, October twentieth capture of a Federal courier the ruse discovered plans of Stone, Baker, and Banks Countermarch to the Ferry road watching the river shell-firing by the enemy the enemy cross in force at Ball's Bluff on Sunday night, and at Edwards's Ferry, Goose Creek, and other Passages on Monday morning details of the battle of Leesburgh General Baker killed Colonel Coggswell, with eight hundred men taken prisoners great slaughter victory of the Confederate forces retreat of the enemy to Maryland our reenforcements arrive. While our brigade was away from Leesburgh, and pickets were no longer at the river, many negroes crossed the stream, and informed the Yankees of our whereabouts. Several Unionists, also, had conferred with their frien
London Tower (search for this): chapter 12
t stir out till victory had saluted our banners. The Yankees who had hid themselves along the bank of the river were 10th to come forth, but after much persuasion, they voluntarily came forward in a body, threw down their arms, and marched to town very good-humoredly, and, after being refreshed, were sent towards Manassas that same night. The quantities of arms we found along the banks surprised me — all being of English manufacture, having on the plates, Hall, London ; Bond, London; London Tower, etc. The stream at the crossing appeared to be literally choked with broken boats, dead bodies, and arms — not less than one hundred dead being piled up under the Bluffs in dozens, and scores in other places, and the sand all gory. The woods around the Bluffs were all cut down or splintered by shot, the trunks of the larger trees looking as if millions of rats had been gnawing them. The number of arms captured was near two thousand, four howitzers, much clothing, a few stores and ammu
Ferry, Goose Creek, and other Passages on Monday morning details of the battle of Leesburgh General Baker killed Colonel Coggswell, with eight hundred men taken prisoners great slaughter victory of the Confederate forces retreat of the enemy t strewn with the dead and wounded in hundreds. General Baker having been killed shortly after our fierce onset, Colonel Coggswell now commanded the enemy, and thought to make good his retreat by a flank movement to Edwards's Ferry. While he delaged with great fury, and it seemed to us there was no end to the stream of fresh troops relieving the enemy. But Colonel Coggswell had succeeded to the command in a luckless hour. Endeavoring to move by the left flank, in order to effect a junctchief in command, marched to the rear. The fighting still continued in the centre, as if the troops were unaware of Coggswell's surrender, but as it was not our object to shed blood unnecessarily, we all ceased firing for a few moments. Our com
ssed the river, and were cheering in consequence Fearful that other forces would move down from Drainsville, and cut off his communication, Evans once more fell back to Goose Creek, where a South-Carolina regiment, a Louisiana regiment, and four guns of the Washington Artillery, reenforced us. Here we anxiously awaited battle from McCall, or any one else who dared to approach. Our reenforcements were eager for the strife, and could a hundred thousand dollars have purchased a battle, they would willingly have subscribed that amount. The Louisianians in particular were fretful for a fight; they had marched from Centreville in a very short time, and in order not to delay, kicked over their barrels of flour, and journeyed with empty haversacks. This regiment was entirely composed of Creoles and Irish--a splendid lot of men, and highly disciplined by Colonel Kelly. They have since greatly distinguished themselves in Stonewall Jackson's division, having turned the tide in many battles.
October 21st (search for this): chapter 12
e men answering roll-call. We were ordered away lower down stream to the mouth of Goose Creek — the enemy had been at both places trying their boats; We picketed all night, nearly frozen to death, had nothing to eat, wore light summer clothes, and had no blankets or fires. Why these three companies were detached so far from the main body I could not tell; we were immediately under the guts of Edwards's Ferry, and were not informed how to retreat. When the sun rose next morning, (October twenty-first,) we anxiously awaited orders of recall; but receiving none, the captains determined to fall back. Seeking the banks of the creek, we followed a hog-path by the water's edge up-hill, and were particularly fortunate in not tumbling over the precipitous banks. We kept to the woods, and had not crossed the hill five minutes when the heavy guns at Edwards's Ferry began to shell furiously, many of their missiles falling in close proximity to our halting-place. Within ten minutes more we
October 20th (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 11: What the enemy did when our forces had left Leesburgh Plots of Union traitors during our absence threatened approach of the enemy from Drainsville upon our right flank we march out to the attack, Sunday, October twentieth capture of a Federal courier the ruse discovered plans of Stone, Baker, and Banks Countermarch to the Ferry road watching the river shell-firing by the enemy the enemy cross in force at Ball's Bluff on Sunday night, and at Edwards's Ferry, Goville road on our right flank and rear; a company of horse were also on our extreme left up the river, and one of the Eighteenth Mississippi occupied Fort Evans midway between the river and town. This was our disposition on Saturday night, October twentieth. Our active lieutenant-colonel had gone out to examine the posts along the river, but had not visited the woods around Ball's Bluff. It was a wild desolate place, and the guards disliked duty in the neighborhood. The Bluff so called was
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