hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George B. McClellan 494 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 418 0 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 336 0 Browse Search
Longstreet 210 2 Browse Search
Fitz-Hugh Lee 204 2 Browse Search
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) 198 0 Browse Search
John Pope 189 1 Browse Search
N. P. Banks 152 2 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 140 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 132 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

Found 121 total hits in 27 results.

1 2 3
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
in the glorious sunshine of the Indian summer-all around us wore an unnatural calm, and every man as he quietly sat or slumbered beneath the. leafy shade seemed lost in reverie. We had nothing to eat, our wagons and stores were far away towards Manassas, and every half hour reports would come in that the enemy seemed very busy at the river, while the glittering of long lines of bayonets could be plainly seen moving to and fro. As if from intuition all the cottagers left their humble dwellings ahid themselves along the bank of the river were 10th to come forth, but after much persuasion, they voluntarily came forward in a body, threw down their arms, and marched to town very good-humoredly, and, after being refreshed, were sent towards Manassas that same night. The quantities of arms we found along the banks surprised me — all being of English manufacture, having on the plates, Hall, London ; Bond, London; London Tower, etc. The stream at the crossing appeared to be literally choked w
Ferry (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 11: What the enemy did when our forces had left Leesburgh Plots of Union traitors during our absence threatened approach of the enemy from Drainsville upon our right flank we march out to the attack, Sunday, October twentieth capture of a Federal courier the ruse discovered plans of Stone, Baker, and Banks Countermarch to the Ferry road watching the river shell-firing by the enemy the enemy cross in force at Ball's Bluff on Sunday night, and at Edwards's Ferry, Goose Creek, and other Passages on Monday morning details of the battle of Leesburgh General Baker killed Colonel Coggswell, with eight hundred men taken prisoners great slaughter victory of the Confederate forces retreat of the enemy to Maryland our reenforcements arrive. While our brigade was away from Leesburgh, and pickets were no longer at the river, many negroes crossed the stream, and informed the Yankees of our whereabouts. Several Unionists, also, had conferred with their frien
London, Madison County, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
r arms, and marched to town very good-humoredly, and, after being refreshed, were sent towards Manassas that same night. The quantities of arms we found along the banks surprised me — all being of English manufacture, having on the plates, Hall, London ; Bond, London; London Tower, etc. The stream at the crossing appeared to be literally choked with broken boats, dead bodies, and arms — not less than one hundred dead being piled up under the Bluffs in dozens, and scores in other places, and thLondon; London Tower, etc. The stream at the crossing appeared to be literally choked with broken boats, dead bodies, and arms — not less than one hundred dead being piled up under the Bluffs in dozens, and scores in other places, and the sand all gory. The woods around the Bluffs were all cut down or splintered by shot, the trunks of the larger trees looking as if millions of rats had been gnawing them. The number of arms captured was near two thousand, four howitzers, much clothing, a few stores and ammunition, eight hundred prisoners, twenty officers, two colonels, one or two stand of colors. The killed and wounded were about two thousand, not including the three large boatloads that sank, or numbers that fell on the isla<
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ssed the river, and were cheering in consequence Fearful that other forces would move down from Drainsville, and cut off his communication, Evans once more fell back to Goose Creek, where a South-Carolina regiment, a Louisiana regiment, and four guns of the Washington Artillery, reenforced us. Here we anxiously awaited battle from McCall, or any one else who dared to approach. Our reenforcements were eager for the strife, and could a hundred thousand dollars have purchased a battle, they would willingly have subscribed that amount. The Louisianians in particular were fretful for a fight; they had marched from Centreville in a very short time, and in order not to delay, kicked over their barrels of flour, and journeyed with empty haversacks. This regiment was entirely composed of Creoles and Irish--a splendid lot of men, and highly disciplined by Colonel Kelly. They have since greatly distinguished themselves in Stonewall Jackson's division, having turned the tide in many battles.
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
en taken prisoners great slaughter victory of the Confederate forces retreat of the enemy to Maryland our reenforcements arrive. While our brigade was away from Leesburgh, and pickets were no lh our army, and was paid thousands of dollars for supplies. His negroes frequently ran away to Maryland, but invariably returned after a few days' absence; a circumstance which rendered it highly proldiers, and I myself have frequently seen signal lights at his house answered from the hills in Maryland. Yet he lived undisturbed in his homestead, and was neither insulted nor annoyed by any one. ot advance, and, to prevent loss from our accurate fire, they were led off from the island into Maryland. Several houses on the island had been converted into hospitals, and the hundreds of sufferingsacre of the enemy. Another remarkable fact: when the Yankees had safely reached the shores of Maryland, they began to cheer like madmen, but for what, will ever remain a mystery. One of the boys dr
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ssed the river, and were cheering in consequence Fearful that other forces would move down from Drainsville, and cut off his communication, Evans once more fell back to Goose Creek, where a South-Carolina regiment, a Louisiana regiment, and four guns of the Washington Artillery, reenforced us. Here we anxiously awaited battle from McCall, or any one else who dared to approach. Our reenforcements were eager for the strife, and could a hundred thousand dollars have purchased a battle, they would willingly have subscribed that amount. The Louisianians in particular were fretful for a fight; they had marched from Centreville in a very short time, and in order not to delay, kicked over their barrels of flour, and journeyed with empty haversacks. This regiment was entirely composed of Creoles and Irish--a splendid lot of men, and highly disciplined by Colonel Kelly. They have since greatly distinguished themselves in Stonewall Jackson's division, having turned the tide in many battles.
Leesburg (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 11: What the enemy did when our forces had left Leesburgh Plots of Union traitors during our absence threatened approach of the enemy from Dramy to Maryland our reenforcements arrive. While our brigade was away from Leesburgh, and pickets were no longer at the river, many negroes crossed the stream, anhomestead, and was neither insulted nor annoyed by any one. Our return to Leesburgh caused some speculation, but the answer to all inquiries was, that we were torossed a few days previously, and seeing only a few tents on the outskirts of Leesburgh, had reported that three companies held the town. About three A. M., Sundetrayed little, yet sufficient to reveal that it was designed to draw us from Leesburgh along the Drainsville road, while Stone crossed-and occupied the town. Evanssquadron of cavalry were sent out to reconnoitre. They galloped gaily toward Leesburgh, and passed a company of the Eighteenth ensconced in the woods. The gay-look
Alexandria (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
rawn up in line of battle, well supplied with artillery. The position of the Eighteenth being known, the enemy began to work their batteries with great vigor, firing twenty-four-pound spherical case-shot, and shelling the woods in all directions. The Eighteenth then fell back towards town, and formed line to the left, with the Seventeenth to the right of the road, and at the foot of a hill on which the artillery was placed in Fort Evans--the first regiment having its left on a bank of the Potomac, while the right of the second regiment lay on Goose Creek, In the rear were the Thirteenth Mississippi and the Eighth Virginia, and still farther beyond was a masked battery in the woods designed to sweep the road, should we be forced back. Skirmishers were sent out to our front, but no enemy appeared; scouts reported them ten thousand strong, with twelve pieces drawn up at the Ferry, but there were no indications of an advance. They still kept shelling the woods vigorously, and their pe
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
uch exhausted and insufficient to attack, we all desired the enemy to advance and try their fortunes. The rain fell in torrents all day, and at midnight three guns and loud cheers were heard from the other bank of the river; the enemy, twelve thousand strong, with twelve pieces, had successfully recrossed the river, and were cheering in consequence Fearful that other forces would move down from Drainsville, and cut off his communication, Evans once more fell back to Goose Creek, where a South-Carolina regiment, a Louisiana regiment, and four guns of the Washington Artillery, reenforced us. Here we anxiously awaited battle from McCall, or any one else who dared to approach. Our reenforcements were eager for the strife, and could a hundred thousand dollars have purchased a battle, they would willingly have subscribed that amount. The Louisianians in particular were fretful for a fight; they had marched from Centreville in a very short time, and in order not to delay, kicked over their
Goose Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
n force at Ball's Bluff on Sunday night, and at Edwards's Ferry, Goose Creek, and other Passages on Monday morning details of the battle of e on duty still lower down the river, watching the ferry,, where Goose Creek flows into the Potomac; another company of horse were watching GMcCall. As the sun had not yet risen we approached the mouth of Goose Creek, crossed it, and passed near the guns of the enemy commanding thll-call. We were ordered away lower down stream to the mouth of Goose Creek — the enemy had been at both places trying their boats; We pickeresh troops now began to pour across the river from the mouth of Goose Creek, and from Edwards's Ferry, until at last there were many regimennk of the Potomac, while the right of the second regiment lay on Goose Creek, In the rear were the Thirteenth Mississippi and the Eighth Virglle, and cut off his communication, Evans once more fell back to Goose Creek, where a South-Carolina regiment, a Louisiana regiment, and four
1 2 3