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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 35
felt hat would not bring half a dollar at any place in times of peace. But he is well mounted and armed, and keeps an eye on General Lee, by whom he expects, to be called at any moment. He is a famous lawyer of South-Carolina, and when the United States were at war with Mexico, President Polk offered him the majorship of the first additional regiment of regulars which was then being raised. He served during that campaign, but achieved no distinction until the affair at Vienna, when he succ dignified man of about forty-five years, possessing a melodious and powerful voice, and has the look of a dashing officer, and is much beloved. He now ranks as Major-General. Archer, Brigadier-General James J. Archer was appointed by the United States Captain of Volunteers, April ninth, 1847, and these being disbanded, was promoted Captain Ninth Infantry, March third, 1855. He is from Maryland, a good officer and commands a fine brigade. Pryor, Wilcox, Featherstone, Ambrose Hill, and othe
Ambrose Hill (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
on advance of Wilcox, Featherstone, and Pryor the centre under Ambrose Hill the Texan brigade brought into action McClellan's infantry cha Jackson was in position at New Coal Harbor on the left, and Ambrose Hill in the centre; it now devolved on Longstreet and D. H. Hill to mght, when we reached the plateau. It was now four P. M., and Ambrose Hill having opened the fight to the left, Pryor, Wilcox, and Feathersrn and north-western corners of the field. But at the same time Ambrose Hill was vigorously pushing the centre of the enemy's line, and some heir still standing camps many thousands would inevitably fall. Ambrose Hill attempted to move forward in the centre, but his division, thoroposed to a flank movement. This was attempted by the enemy, but Ambrose Hill, in withdrawing from the centre, had marched by our rear, and lafficer and commands a fine brigade. Pryor, Wilcox, Featherstone, Ambrose Hill, and others, were hurling their commands at the stubborn enemy,
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
seems to take little notice of complimentary remarks regarding the action at Beaver Dam Creek in the morning, but is absorbed and anxious for the work assigned him. He is a thorough soldier, and when commanding the Seventeenth Mississippi, drilled his battalion thrice a day through all the heat of summer, apparently enjoying the exercise more than any. At Leesburgh he led his regiment in the last charge, and drove many of the enemy into the river. He is a lawyer and politician of note in Mississippi, very careless of dress, and very blunt in his manner. Having received orders, Wilcox, Featherstone, and Pryor ride off at a gallop, and some prophesy that the advance will soon begin. Besides these and other generals, there are a few civilians present, chiefly land-owners in the neighborhood, who have come to see the havoc perpetrated by General Sykes's regulars, who were encamped around here. A courier comes galloping forward, delivers his papers to Lee, who soon after mounts, and
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
munition wagons, lighting up the scene on every hand. But while Whiting, Hood, General John B. Hood is from Tennessee, and was for some time in the old army, but resigned, and followed the legal profession in his native State. When hostilities commenced he was among the first to take the field, and was appointed Colonel of the Fourth Texan Infantry, and subsequently placed in command of the Texan Brigade, which consisted of the First, Fourth, and Fifth Texas, Eighteenth Georgia, and Hampton's Legion. He led the brigade on foot in the famous charge of the batteries, and rendered his name forever famous. He is a splendid-looking, dignified man of about forty-five years, possessing a melodious and powerful voice, and has the look of a dashing officer, and is much beloved. He now ranks as Major-General. Archer, Brigadier-General James J. Archer was appointed by the United States Captain of Volunteers, April ninth, 1847, and these being disbanded, was promoted Captain Ninth I
Chickahominy (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
risoners at every turn, the distant roar of cannon several miles away to our front, breaks upon the car. News is soon brought that Jackson in person is breaking the enemy's line of retreat towards their fortified camps on the north bank of the Chickahominy, and that he has already captured several thousand prisoners, including cannon, wagons, and officers of all ranks. Thus at eight P. M., Friday, June twenty-seventh, the Battle of Gaines's Mill was over, and the victory was ours! Courierst wing and centre, which had been opposed to us. It was obvious, indeed, from the roar of musketry to our front, and southward across the creek, that we were driving the enemy closely towards their fortified hills and camps on the banks of the Chickahominy, yet McClellan might even make a second attempt to maintain possession of the north bank, under cover of his numerous fortifications, which were still untouched. These could be seen, not more than a mile distant, with camp-fires burning; whil
Vienna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
e his common black felt hat would not bring half a dollar at any place in times of peace. But he is well mounted and armed, and keeps an eye on General Lee, by whom he expects, to be called at any moment. He is a famous lawyer of South-Carolina, and when the United States were at war with Mexico, President Polk offered him the majorship of the first additional regiment of regulars which was then being raised. He served during that campaign, but achieved no distinction until the affair at Vienna, when he successfully smashed up a Dutch General's reconnoissance on the railroad, as narrated in another place. Gregg is called! he leans his head through a window and converses with Lee, but trots away as if dissatisfied. There goes Gregg, some one remarks, looking as black as thunder because not appointed to the advance. Wilcox, Pryor, and Featherstone are also present, conversing freely and gaily, as if about to start upon some pleasant pic-nic. The latter is a long-bodied, eagle-
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
courier comes galloping forward, delivers his papers to Lee, who soon after mounts, and with Longstreet and staffs, proceeds to New Coal Harbor, where it is said Jackson's right wing has already arrived. Magruder's guns have stopped their cannonade, and the advance begins, through the woods towards Gaines's Mills. Jackson wasin the north-eastern and north-western corners of the field. But at the same time Ambrose Hill was vigorously pushing the centre of the enemy's line, and some of Jackson's forces had come into action on the left, from New Coal Harbor, by the road approaching the field in the north-western corner. Being driven from the woods and unished, and while engaged in re-forming their lines, and bringing forward fresh forces, their right was assailed with great fury by our left, and at the same time Jackson's main force, assured of our victory, was rapidly marching through the country to their right and rear. The absence of artillery sorely perplexed us, and part
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
fall. Ambrose Hill attempted to move forward in the centre, but his division, thoroughly exhausted by hard marching and constant fighting, was unequal to the task, and was withdrawn in favor of Whiting's division of Texans, Alabamians, and Mississippians. The troops of the two latter States had succored Pryor on the left, and had been actively engaged since the combat opened, but the Texan Brigade was held in reserve, and as this was the first great fight in which they had participated in Virginia, a desperate part was assigned them to act. While dispositions were being made for the final struggle, the sun sank upon the scene, and perhaps mistaking the cause of our inactivity, McClellan moved up heavy masses of infantry to drive us from the woods. Their advance was beautiful, and as they came on in unbroken line, with colors waving and men cheering, a thrill of admiration was felt by all. When within a hundred yards, our men, who lay close to the ground in the edge of the timber
Leesburg (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
neasily in his saddle, and with his downcast eyes appears very thoughtful; but he is a desperate, unflinching man when once aroused. He seems to take little notice of complimentary remarks regarding the action at Beaver Dam Creek in the morning, but is absorbed and anxious for the work assigned him. He is a thorough soldier, and when commanding the Seventeenth Mississippi, drilled his battalion thrice a day through all the heat of summer, apparently enjoying the exercise more than any. At Leesburgh he led his regiment in the last charge, and drove many of the enemy into the river. He is a lawyer and politician of note in Mississippi, very careless of dress, and very blunt in his manner. Having received orders, Wilcox, Featherstone, and Pryor ride off at a gallop, and some prophesy that the advance will soon begin. Besides these and other generals, there are a few civilians present, chiefly land-owners in the neighborhood, who have come to see the havoc perpetrated by General Sy
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 35
His hair is grey; he has full whiskers and moustaches and a ruddy complexion; in person, he is thick-set, of medium height, and is jocular in his manner. His uniform looked the worse for wear; even the three stars upon his throat being dingy and ragged, while his common black felt hat would not bring half a dollar at any place in times of peace. But he is well mounted and armed, and keeps an eye on General Lee, by whom he expects, to be called at any moment. He is a famous lawyer of South-Carolina, and when the United States were at war with Mexico, President Polk offered him the majorship of the first additional regiment of regulars which was then being raised. He served during that campaign, but achieved no distinction until the affair at Vienna, when he successfully smashed up a Dutch General's reconnoissance on the railroad, as narrated in another place. Gregg is called! he leans his head through a window and converses with Lee, but trots away as if dissatisfied. There go
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