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Darbytown (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
isputing his passage across a creek. To our front the roads ascended, with a few fields on either hand, and among the timber on the high ground I saw small spiral columns of light-blue smoke ascending, which assured us that troops of some kind were there. Shortly after wards a few musket-shots were heard in that direction, and some of the cavalry came galloping down towards us with the news that the enemy occupied the open high lands constituting Frazier's Farm, five miles north-east of Darbytown, on the Newmarket road. The place was represented as good for defence; the woods right and left of it swarmed with skirmishers; the ascending grade of the road was swept by cannon, while all attempts to flank their left would meet with broadsides from the gunboats at Curl's Neck, in the James River, two and a half miles distant. Nothing daunted, Hill sent word to the rear for our artillery to hurry forward, and immediately commenced his advance. Throwing our regiments to the right an
Pikesville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
the vast armaments fitting out at Fortress Monroe. He evacuated the place in April, 1862, according to orders, and served, as we have shown, at Seven pines, and during the week's campaign before Richmond. The army has spoken bitterly of his slowness, and he was removed from active operations, and appointed Chief of Ordnance. He entered the old service at an early age, and when hostilities commenced was Brevet Colonel, Chief of Ordnance, being stationed at the extensive arsenal of Pikesville, in Maryland. He has a son in our army, who has greatly distinguished himself as captain of artillery. would have fallen upon the enemy's rear; but, as usual, that commander was behind time, and Hill, as a consequence, was almost annihilated. It was said that Huger would have arrived in time to assist in the sanguinary contest, but on the way found the enemy had destroyed the bridge over a creek, and hotly disputed his passage with many guns. An artillery duel ensued, in which we vanquished
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
uniform is much worn, and far from imposing, so that few would take him for a major-general. He is brave to a fault, but that does not compensate for the want of a quick, penetrating intellect, and rapidity of movement. When the Norfolk Navy Yard (Virginia) was destroyed and evacuated by the Federals, April twentieth, 1861, he was appointed commander of that post, and elaborately fortified it with hundreds of guns found there, bidding defiance to all the vast armaments fitting out at Fortress Monroe. He evacuated the place in April, 1862, according to orders, and served, as we have shown, at Seven pines, and during the week's campaign before Richmond. The army has spoken bitterly of his slowness, and he was removed from active operations, and appointed Chief of Ordnance. He entered the old service at an early age, and when hostilities commenced was Brevet Colonel, Chief of Ordnance, being stationed at the extensive arsenal of Pikesville, in Maryland. He has a son in our army, w
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
by cannon, while all attempts to flank their left would meet with broadsides from the gunboats at Curl's Neck, in the James River, two and a half miles distant. Nothing daunted, Hill sent word to the rear for our artillery to hurry forward, andin April, 1862, according to orders, and served, as we have shown, at Seven pines, and during the week's campaign before Richmond. The army has spoken bitterly of his slowness, and he was removed from active operations, and appointed Chief of Ordnanment in the shade, and rushed together in the deadly shock of battle. Standing near Frazier's house and looking towards Richmond, the land gradually falls, but at this spot more abruptly; so that the enemy drawn up in battle array on the open farm, other, and close up with his rear-guard in the very face of his gunboats! Still they shout with stentorian lungs, On to Richmond! Victory! Victory! Another great battle! another big smash — up of the rebels! etc. Truly this battle was more tha
Newmarket, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
ge across a creek. To our front the roads ascended, with a few fields on either hand, and among the timber on the high ground I saw small spiral columns of light-blue smoke ascending, which assured us that troops of some kind were there. Shortly after wards a few musket-shots were heard in that direction, and some of the cavalry came galloping down towards us with the news that the enemy occupied the open high lands constituting Frazier's Farm, five miles north-east of Darbytown, on the Newmarket road. The place was represented as good for defence; the woods right and left of it swarmed with skirmishers; the ascending grade of the road was swept by cannon, while all attempts to flank their left would meet with broadsides from the gunboats at Curl's Neck, in the James River, two and a half miles distant. Nothing daunted, Hill sent word to the rear for our artillery to hurry forward, and immediately commenced his advance. Throwing our regiments to the right and left of the road
Ambrose Hill (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
Chapter 36: Pursuit of McClellan continued battle of Frazier's Farm, June thirtieth terrific fighting total rout of the enemy capture of Major General McCall precarious position of General Hill his genius and daring Gossip with a Contraband. It was now about half-past 5 P. M., and the sun was fast sinking behind the woods, when Ambrose Hill's column halted; cannonading was plainly heard on our left, in front, from the supposed route of Huger, and couriers brought word that the Federals were disputing his passage across a creek. To our front the roads ascended, with a few fields on either hand, and among the timber on the high ground I saw small spiral columns of light-blue smoke ascending, which assured us that troops of some kind were there. Shortly after wards a few musket-shots were heard in that direction, and some of the cavalry came galloping down towards us with the news that the enemy occupied the open high lands constituting Frazier's Farm, five miles
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
my's gunboats lit up the heavens with vivid flashes, and shell and iron bolts whizzed and screamed through the air, tearing down the trees like things of pasteboard, a singular incident occurred in the captured camps round Frazier's house. Some Virginia and other troops were leaning on the guns, and conversing about the battle, when a party of horsemen rode up, the chief of whom said: Who guard these guns? We do, was the answer. That's right, boys, was the pleasant reply; don't let them fall orm is much worn, and far from imposing, so that few would take him for a major-general. He is brave to a fault, but that does not compensate for the want of a quick, penetrating intellect, and rapidity of movement. When the Norfolk Navy Yard (Virginia) was destroyed and evacuated by the Federals, April twentieth, 1861, he was appointed commander of that post, and elaborately fortified it with hundreds of guns found there, bidding defiance to all the vast armaments fitting out at Fortress Monr
Mechanicsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 37
sued, in which we vanquished them. Our cavalry rode over to secure the pieces, but were met by a strong force of infantry and obliged to return. Hearing the firing at Frazier's, the Federal commander retreated, after delaying Huger more than five hours, and joined forces with McCall against the heroic Hill. Had not Hill's division been made of steel, rather than flesh and blood, they could not have withstood the many hardships of these trying days, for after fighting desperately at Mechanicsville on Thursday, they marched to Gaines's Mills and fought five hours on Friday; rested part of Saturday; travelled a circuitous route and a terrible road of forty miles on Sunday and Monday, achieving another brilliant victory, unassisted, against great odds! Hill, however, is a general of genius, and had it not been for the scientific handling of his men, few would have slept uninjured on the torn and bloody field on Monday night. All were prostrated with fatigue, and lay on the ground wi
Featherstone (search for this): chapter 37
lleys upon any who dared approach their guns, now in full play in the open fields. When our line was re-formed, however, and the wings began to press forward, Featherstone, Pryor, and Wilcox pushed the centre vigorously, and the first-named, making a rush for the guns, seized them, but had to fall back under the fire of a heavy fd to have no limit, for as soon as one regiment was vanquished another was pushed forward in its place, so that it required great efforts to drive them back. Featherstone and Fields made another dash at their batteries, but were so shattered they could not hold them. At last, after resting some time, these two commanders rushedr covering, or food, too weary to think of any thing but rest. To show the character of the fighting. for the past few days, I will merely state that when Featherstone's and other brigades went into action on Friday morning, each mustered an. aggregate of from two to three thousand men, but when returns were made late on Mond
James McCall (search for this): chapter 37
an continued battle of Frazier's Farm, June thirtieth terrific fighting total rout of the enemy capture of Major General McCall precarious position of General Hill his genius and daring Gossip with a Contraband. It was now about half-past re of a heavy force, and suffered much. Wilcox and Pryor performed prodigies of valor with their exhausted brigades, yet McCall's resources seemed to have no limit, for as soon as one regiment was vanquished another was pushed forward in its place, mistake they had made, fired and killed them; the third person, whom they arrested, proved to be no other than Major-General James McCall, United States Army, one of those who had commanded in the engagement. Though late in the night, the enemy e firing at Frazier's, the Federal commander retreated, after delaying Huger more than five hours, and joined forces with McCall against the heroic Hill. Had not Hill's division been made of steel, rather than flesh and blood, they could not have
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