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Browsing named entities in a specific section of An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. Search the whole document.

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eenth of July, and the enemy were advancing in four columns upon Fairfax Court-House. General Bonham's brigade of South-Carolinians held the post, and had fortified it. Having made every disposition for the fight, of which he was in anxious expectation, it was much to his chagrin and disappointment that he received orders to retreat when the enemy were but a few miles distant. With much cursing, the brigade hastily fell back to Centreville, and camped on the heights on the evening of the seventeenth, the enemy's fires being visible about a mile distant. On the same day our brigade received orders to move to the front, and we quietly bivouacked in the woods on the banks of the Bull Run to guard McLean's Ford. In this position we formed the right centre, and as our troops stood in excellent repute with the army, it was surmised that there was warm work in store for us — a supposition that was strongly confirmed when not less than seven guns of the Washington Corps were detailed for
July 14th (search for this): chapter 5
the exact type of a French engineer, and could not anywhere be mistaken for a civilian. He is jaunty in his gait, dashing in manner, and evidently takes delight in the circumstance of war. It must be confessed his modesty is equal to his merit-he is not imperious or overbearing, bears great respect for his brother officers of the old service, and is never seen to such advantage as when standing on an earthwork, and giving orders, or conversing with animated gesture. It was now the fourteenth of July, and the enemy were advancing in four columns upon Fairfax Court-House. General Bonham's brigade of South-Carolinians held the post, and had fortified it. Having made every disposition for the fight, of which he was in anxious expectation, it was much to his chagrin and disappointment that he received orders to retreat when the enemy were but a few miles distant. With much cursing, the brigade hastily fell back to Centreville, and camped on the heights on the evening of the seventeent
July 18th (search for this): chapter 5
Warlike preparations around Manassas Beauregard and other Generals our position at Bull Run advance of the enemy a night surprise loss to the enemy General Tyler advances to force a passage at Blackburn's Ford battle of Bull Run, July eighteenth the enemy retire, with loss anxiety regarding Johnston's movements night adventures courage of an English Landowner our Generals forewarned of meditated movements. For several days I was unwell, and could not attend to duty, but beinsition, ascended a hill, whence he could view the Federal rout in detail. Poor Tyler, said some one in the group, his decapitation has come early; and, true enough, his name has scarcely ever been whispered in the North since that fatal eighteenth day of July. In Northern reports, indeed, this affair is lightly spoken of as a reconnoissance that was eminently successful in every way; nevertheless, we positively know that that division was so roughly handled and dispirited that it was withdraw
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 5
apter 4: Warlike preparations around Manassas Beauregard and other Generals our position at Bull Run advance of quartermaster-general, and ranked as lieutenantcolonel; Beauregard had been major of engineers; Evans, Longstreet, and othe and Polk were in Tennessee, and Johnston in the Valley; Beauregard was alone at Manassas, having Evans, Ewell, Longstreet, mes, as subordinates in the approaching struggle. Of Beauregard I knew little, but had heard much. He was continually mo imagine any other reason. At the critical moment, General Beauregard rode to the front, sent orders to Colonel Ferguson ot battle fought on the following Sunday. The escapes of Beauregard that afternoon were almost miraculous. Shells penetrateo not, believe that an advance was seriously intended by Beauregard, although he is proverbially a dashing and spirited comm, dressed himself. Mounted men were immediately sent to Beauregard, yet no additional force arrived, and Evans was left to
He is jaunty in his gait, dashing in manner, and evidently takes delight in the circumstance of war. It must be confessed his modesty is equal to his merit-he is not imperious or overbearing, bears great respect for his brother officers of the old service, and is never seen to such advantage as when standing on an earthwork, and giving orders, or conversing with animated gesture. It was now the fourteenth of July, and the enemy were advancing in four columns upon Fairfax Court-House. General Bonham's brigade of South-Carolinians held the post, and had fortified it. Having made every disposition for the fight, of which he was in anxious expectation, it was much to his chagrin and disappointment that he received orders to retreat when the enemy were but a few miles distant. With much cursing, the brigade hastily fell back to Centreville, and camped on the heights on the evening of the seventeenth, the enemy's fires being visible about a mile distant. On the same day our brigade rec
ter-general, and ranked as lieutenantcolonel; Beauregard had been major of engineers; Evans, Longstreet, and others, did not rank higher than major of cavalry or infantry, and had seen but little service, except on the frontier among the Indians; Bragg was a retired captain of artillery; T. J. Jackson was professor of mathematics and of tactics in the University of Virginia; D. H. Hill was a lawyer; Polk, an Episcopal bishop in Louisiana, etc. This was all the talent we had, and much of it was only said to be promising. General Lee was at Richmond, acting as Secretary of War; General Cooper was there also as adjutant-general; Bragg and Polk were in Tennessee, and Johnston in the Valley; Beauregard was alone at Manassas, having Evans, Ewell, Longstreet, and a few less known names, as subordinates in the approaching struggle. Of Beauregard I knew little, but had heard much. He was continually moving about from place to place, his appearance and escort being so unostentatious tha
Longstreet, and others, did not rank higher than major of cavalry or infantry, and had seen but little service, except on the frontier among the Indians; Bragg was a retired captain of artillery; T. J. Jackson was professor of mathematics and of tactics in the University of Virginia; D. H. Hill was a lawyer; Polk, an Episcopal bishop in Louisiana, etc. This was all the talent we had, and much of it was only said to be promising. General Lee was at Richmond, acting as Secretary of War; General Cooper was there also as adjutant-general; Bragg and Polk were in Tennessee, and Johnston in the Valley; Beauregard was alone at Manassas, having Evans, Ewell, Longstreet, and a few less known names, as subordinates in the approaching struggle. Of Beauregard I knew little, but had heard much. He was continually moving about from place to place, his appearance and escort being so unostentatious that many met and passed without knowing him. It was his custom to walk in the garden of the cott
Yankee Doodle (search for this): chapter 5
Virginia spread great joy among the volunteers, and such was the enthusiasm it caused, that many regiments who, in ambush, had witnessed the fight, could scarcely be controlled by their officers: the Seventh Louisiana obliged their commanders to move forward into the open ground, to participate in the engagement, but they were too late, for the game had taken wing to their nest on the hills. It is strange to remark that the retreating foe shouted vociferously, and their bands struck up Yankee Doodle and other Northern airs, perhaps in joy for their safe retreat, it being impossible to imagine any other reason. At the critical moment, General Beauregard rode to the front, sent orders to Colonel Ferguson of his staff to pursue as far as practicable, and, galloping past our position, ascended a hill, whence he could view the Federal rout in detail. Poor Tyler, said some one in the group, his decapitation has come early; and, true enough, his name has scarcely ever been whispered in t
Nathan Evans (search for this): chapter 5
quartermaster-general, and ranked as lieutenantcolonel; Beauregard had been major of engineers; Evans, Longstreet, and others, did not rank higher than major of cavalry or infantry, and had seen butand Polk were in Tennessee, and Johnston in the Valley; Beauregard was alone at Manassas, having Evans, Ewell, Longstreet, and a few less known names, as subordinates in the approaching struggle. It was past two. A. M. on Sunday when Mr. Thornton ushered himself into the presence of Colonel Nathan Evans, who commanded a brigade near Stone Bridge. Evans listened to the narration, asked impoEvans listened to the narration, asked important questions,--and, arriving at conclusions, maliciously showed his white teeth with a wicked grin, and, ordering coffee, dressed himself. Mounted men were immediately sent to Beauregard, yet no additional force arrived, and Evans was left to his own resources. Detaching a portion of his brigade, he immediately moved up towards Sudley Ford, and reenforced the Fourth Alabama Regiment and a M
only said to be promising. General Lee was at Richmond, acting as Secretary of War; General Cooper was there also as adjutant-general; Bragg and Polk were in Tennessee, and Johnston in the Valley; Beauregard was alone at Manassas, having Evans, Ewell, Longstreet, and a few less known names, as subordinates in the approaching struggle. Of Beauregard I knew little, but had heard much. He was continually moving about from place to place, his appearance and escort being so unostentatious thaor us — a supposition that was strongly confirmed when not less than seven guns of the Washington Corps were detailed for our support. From our position to Blackburn's Ford was half a mile, and there Longstreet was posted with a strong brigade. Ewell was to our right, lower down, and across the Run at Union Mills. While we stood in line of battle, scouts came in, reporting the enemy's approach en masse. In the afternoon an Alabama regiment came in, in good order, bringing all its baggage. T
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