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Bedford (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
few days ago had a skirmish with Livingston's band about sixteen miles north of Neosho, and got three of his men badly wounded, but succeeded in killing and wounding seven of the enemy, and putting the remainder to flight. Captain Mefford is an experienced officer, and a better one could not be selected to deal with Livingston's guerrillas. Several persons who have just arrived from Fort Gibson report that grass is coming up in sufficient quantities on the Arkansas River and lower Grand River bottoms for grazing purposes. While Indian ponies might live there on the grass now, it will probably be two or three weeks before our cavalry horses can live on wild grass, and perform the service required of them. It is necessary that they should have such strength-giving food as corn and oats, if the cavalry arm of the service is to be very effective. But all the approaching signs of spring increase the anxiety of the Indians to get into the nation. They have, not, however, as yet
Boonsborough (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
n was received here yesterday evening that a rebel force of one hundred men were seen the day before in the vicinity of Cane Hill. Colonel Phillips immediately sent out a detachment of cavalry under Captain Fred Crafts to discover the movements ofl Phillips has information leading him to believe that the rebel force which was seen a few days ago in the vicinity of Cane Hill, has gone north, possibly with the view of attacking our train. A man was found dead to-day just outside the limitsinity, our troops having well-nigh exhausted the supply when we were encamped near here last fall, before the battle of Cane Hill. When we leave here we shall march to Illinois river, twelve miles south. To-day, March 23d, a number of officers xth Kansas cavalry, with about two hundred men, returned last night from Dutch Mills, a small place a few miles west of Cane Hill, and right on the line of Arkansas and the Cherokee Nation. We wore sent out two days ago with the view of ascertainin
Bentonville (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
oodstuffs the soldiers exchange their surplus rations for butter, eggs, &c the army ration a party of Union men arrive from Texas they were hunted by the enemy with blood hounds. On the morning of the 17th of March we struck tents, left Bentonville, and marched fifteen miles southwest to Big Springs, at the head of Flint Creek. This is a more desirable section than around Bentonville. The spring here is one of the finest in Northwestern Arkansas, and furnishes an abundance of excellenBentonville. The spring here is one of the finest in Northwestern Arkansas, and furnishes an abundance of excellent water for ourselves and animals. It arises out of the earth almost like a fountain, and runs off in a strong, swift current. This would be a delightful spot for a village, for, at a small cost the water from this spring could be conducted through pipes into the houses for the convenience of families. Our camp is called Camp Moonlight, in honor of Colonel Thomas Moonlight, of the Eleventh Kansas infantry, who was General Blunt's Chief of Staff during the campaign in this section last fall.
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
the people of a less haughty spirit than in Missouri Reconnoissance returned from Dutch Mills wone when he marched the Kansas brigade through Missouri to join General Fremont's army at Springfieldsatisfaction to the two political factions in Missouri. The people of Missouri and Kansas, I thiMissouri and Kansas, I think, as a general thing, feel kindly towards General Curtis since he won the great battle of Pea Ridgthe noncombatant classes of this state, as in Missouri. This may be due to the fact that — there was much less wealth and luxury here than in Missouri before the war. We nowhere see in this section fbeen seen in most of the western counties of Missouri a few years ago. The people of Missouri, withMissouri, with their slave labor and abundance of everything, acted as if they felt their superiority to the peoplur detachments which have just come down from Missouri and Kansas, say that the season is nearly twoxas, is the leader of the party. He lived in Missouri at the breaking out of the war, and moved to
Riverside (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ient place for pitching our camp. There is very little forage in this vicinity, our troops having well-nigh exhausted the supply when we were encamped near here last fall, before the battle of Cane Hill. When we leave here we shall march to Illinois river, twelve miles south. To-day, March 23d, a number of officers who have recently been appointed by the Secretary of War to positions in the Fourth and Fifth Indian regiments, reported to Colonel Phillips for duty. As the Fourth and Fifth Ire are no men enlisted for the Fourth and Fifth Indian regiments, all the same as if they were fighting, skirmishing and marching every day. The Indian division left Big Springs or Camp Moonlight on the morning of the 24th, and marched to Illinois River twelve miles south. This brings us within ten or twelve miles of Rhea's Mills, where the Army of the Frontier, under General Blunt, was encamped during the month of December. Colonel Phillips has named our camp here Camp Pomeroy, in hono
Fort Smith (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
A party of seven guerrillas was seen yesterday evening less than a mile from our camp, but they soon disappeared in the thick woods. Whether they are prowling around intent on some mischief, or whether they have unintentionally come upon us while passing through the country to some other locality, is not known. But as the soldiers express it, it will hardly be safe for them to roost in this vicinity. It is possible that they have been sent by the rebel commanding officer at Van Buren or Fort Smith, into this section, for the purpose of ascertaining whether our whole force is moving south, or only a reconnoitering party. In a few days the organized forces of the enemy north of the Arkansas River will find it convenient to retire to the south bank. There is now no prospect of Colonel Phillip's progress being checked this side of Fort Gibson. Yesterday morning (28th) a detachment of thirty men were sent to Neosho with the mail for the North, and instructions to the commanding off
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
no such regiments exist criticisms concerning the matter near Rhea's Mills again two loyal Arkansas regiments organized after a battle the people show on which side their sympathies are by theirmore desirable section than around Bentonville. The spring here is one of the finest in Northwestern Arkansas, and furnishes an abundance of excellent water for ourselves and animals. It arises out animals. But we are gradually moving south with a prospect of holding the country. Two loyal Arkansas regiments belonging to, Colonel Phillips' division are stationed at Fayetteville, fifteen milest night from Dutch Mills, a small place a few miles west of Cane Hill, and right on the line of Arkansas and the Cherokee Nation. We wore sent out two days ago with the view of ascertaining as far as than ours, during the present war. Eleven men came into our camp to-day (31st) from southwestern Arkansas and northern Texas. J. R. Pratt, a staunch and prominent Unionist from Texas, is the lea
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ge their surplus rations for butter, eggs, &c the army ration a party of Union men arrive from Texas they were hunted by the enemy with blood hounds. On the morning of the 17th of March we stru present war. Eleven men came into our camp to-day (31st) from southwestern Arkansas and northern Texas. J. R. Pratt, a staunch and prominent Unionist from Texas, is the leader of the party. He lTexas, is the leader of the party. He lived in Missouri at the breaking out of the war, and moved to Texas to keep out of it, but soon found that it was not a suitable place for a man whose sympathies were with the Government. These men Texas to keep out of it, but soon found that it was not a suitable place for a man whose sympathies were with the Government. These men represent a dreadful state of things in the sections which they have recently left. Mr. Pratt states that in northwestern Texas, there are many Union families, and that the Union men have made sevenorthwestern Texas, there are many Union families, and that the Union men have made several attempts to organize, but that such attempts have resulted disastrously to all those whose names were connected with any loyal demonstration. He also represents that a good many Unionists have be
Dutch Mills (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
inforced a bushwhacker killed near camp the people should be better informed by proclamation of the Federal purposes officers for the Fourth and Fifth Indian regiments report to Colonel Phillips no such regiments exist criticisms concerning the matter near Rhea's Mills again two loyal Arkansas regiments organized after a battle the people show on which side their sympathies are by their expressions the people of a less haughty spirit than in Missouri Reconnoissance returned from Dutch Mills women and children raise their own foodstuffs the soldiers exchange their surplus rations for butter, eggs, &c the army ration a party of Union men arrive from Texas they were hunted by the enemy with blood hounds. On the morning of the 17th of March we struck tents, left Bentonville, and marched fifteen miles southwest to Big Springs, at the head of Flint Creek. This is a more desirable section than around Bentonville. The spring here is one of the finest in Northwestern Arkan
Dutch Mills (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
sho, in regard to removing the troops and all the refugee Indian families from there to the nation. By the time they will be able to join us, their ponies can live by grazing on the grass of the river bottoms. They will no doubt be delighted beyond expression that the time has come for their return to their homes from their long exile. Captain N. B. Lucas and Lieutenant W. M. Smalley, of the battalion of the Sixth Kansas cavalry, with about two hundred men, returned last night from Dutch Mills, a small place a few miles west of Cane Hill, and right on the line of Arkansas and the Cherokee Nation. We wore sent out two days ago with the view of ascertaining as far as possible any contemplated movements of the enemy, as information had been received here via Fayetteville, that a rebel force of a thousand men, under Colonel Carroll, were encamped at Van Buren on the 24th, and were intending to move north on the state line road. From all the information we could get there is no re
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