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he War Department that there are no men enlisted for the Fourth and Fifth Indian regiments, all the same as if they were fighting, skirmishing and marching every day. The Indian division left Big Springs or Camp Moonlight on the morning of the 24th, and marched to Illinois River twelve miles south. This brings us within ten or twelve miles of Rhea's Mills, where the Army of the Frontier, under General Blunt, was encamped during the month of December. Colonel Phillips has named our camp ys ago with the view of ascertaining as far as possible any contemplated movements of the enemy, as information had been received here via Fayetteville, that a rebel force of a thousand men, under Colonel Carroll, were encamped at Van Buren on the 24th, and were intending to move north on the state line road. From all the information we could get there is no reason to believe that Colonel Carroll's force will make any effort to operate north of the mountains for several weeks. If Colonel M. La
impatience, but are content to be guided by the judgment of Colonel Phillips. As soon as transportation can be had to remove the Refugee Indian families from Neosho, they will leave that place to join this command in the nation. It is not likely, however, that the transportation will be in readiness before the first of April. And perhaps it would not be advisable for them to leave there at an earlier date, as in this latitude there frequently occurs some severe weather the latter part of March. As the season is always about a week further advanced at Fort Gibson, there will be no unnecessary delay in their removal. Information was received here yesterday evening that a rebel force of one hundred men were seen the day before in the vicinity of Cane Hill. Colonel Phillips immediately sent out a detachment of cavalry under Captain Fred Crafts to discover the movements of the enemy, but the force returned here this evening without being able to ascertain anything definite in re
March 17th (search for this): chapter 10
near Rhea's Mills again two loyal Arkansas regiments organized after a battle the people show on which side their sympathies are by their expressions the people of a less haughty spirit than in Missouri Reconnoissance returned from Dutch Mills women and children raise their own foodstuffs the soldiers exchange their surplus rations for butter, eggs, &c the army ration a party of Union men arrive from Texas they were hunted by the enemy with blood hounds. On the morning of the 17th of March we struck tents, left Bentonville, and marched fifteen miles southwest to Big Springs, at the head of Flint Creek. This is a more desirable section than around Bentonville. The spring here is one of the finest in Northwestern Arkansas, and furnishes an abundance of excellent water for ourselves and animals. It arises out of the earth almost like a fountain, and runs off in a strong, swift current. This would be a delightful spot for a village, for, at a small cost the water from th
March 23rd (search for this): chapter 10
rate every opportunity should be given them to return to their allegiance to the Government. Colonel Phillips, with a detachment of one hundred cavalry, started out to-day in search of another convenient place for pitching our camp. There is very little forage in this vicinity, our troops having well-nigh exhausted the supply when we were encamped near here last fall, before the battle of Cane Hill. When we leave here we shall march to Illinois river, twelve miles south. To-day, March 23d, a number of officers who have recently been appointed by the Secretary of War to positions in the Fourth and Fifth Indian regiments, reported to Colonel Phillips for duty. As the Fourth and Fifth Indian regiments are purely imaginary organizations, as far as any one here knows, it is difficult to see what duty Colonel Phillips can assign them to. If these gentlemen were anxious to serve the Government at this critical time, the authorities at Washington might have given them permission
llips. As soon as transportation can be had to remove the Refugee Indian families from Neosho, they will leave that place to join this command in the nation. It is not likely, however, that the transportation will be in readiness before the first of April. And perhaps it would not be advisable for them to leave there at an earlier date, as in this latitude there frequently occurs some severe weather the latter part of March. As the season is always about a week further advanced at Fort Gibsoorses and mules were left in this section after our army moved north last winter. Arrangements are being made to remove all the sick: of this division to Hilterbrand's Mills, about thirty miles west of here, in the Cherokee nation, on the first of April. We know now that we shall move across the line into the Nation in a few days. The peach trees have been in bloom for several days, and the swelling buds on the forest trees are ready to burst, and display their young leaflets, and we see
w months, or until the facts are reported to the War Department that there are no men enlisted for the Fourth and Fifth Indian regiments, all the same as if they were fighting, skirmishing and marching every day. The Indian division left Big Springs or Camp Moonlight on the morning of the 24th, and marched to Illinois River twelve miles south. This brings us within ten or twelve miles of Rhea's Mills, where the Army of the Frontier, under General Blunt, was encamped during the month of December. Colonel Phillips has named our camp here Camp Pomeroy, in honor of Senator Pomeroy, of Kansas. Should a Post office be established at this place after the war, it will probably take the name of our present camp. On this river there are some fine tracts of land, and the farmer is no doubt well rewarded for his labor. The opening of spring, and the fact that our army was all over this section last fall and the early winter, will make it difficult to obtain forage, except in very sm
el Thomas Moonlight, of the Eleventh Kansas infantry, who was General Blunt's Chief of Staff during the campaign in this section last fall. He is a brilliant officer, and, in personal appearance, one of the finest looking officers we had in the division. He is a Scotchman by birth, and is about six feet two inches in height, well proportioned, and his presence, though commanding, is not too stern, and altogether is likely to produce a favorable impression. I remember him during the fall of 1861, as commanding Moonlight's battery, the first light battery raised in Kansas. I think he was also on the staff of General James H. Lane when he marched the Kansas brigade through Missouri to join General Fremont's army at Springfield. No officer has been more active in organizing and fitting out our Kansas troops for the field; nor has any officer been more active in the field than Colonel Moonlight. His sound judgment and counsel no doubt contributed largely to the success of our campaign
H. S. Anderson (search for this): chapter 10
in Fred Crafts to discover the movements of the enemy, but the force returned here this evening without being able to ascertain anything definite in regard to the enemy. It is not very likely that such a small force would remain many hours at any place within twenty miles of this command. This was probably a scouting party of the enemy sent our from the rebel camp below Van Buren, .to discover something if possible in regard to our movements. A detachment of seventy-five men under Captain H. S. Anderson, Third Indian regiment, were sent out to-day to overtake and reinforce the escort to our supply train which left here yesterday morning en route to Fort Scott. It appears that Colonel Phillips has information leading him to believe that the rebel force which was seen a few days ago in the vicinity of Cane Hill, has gone north, possibly with the view of attacking our train. A man was found dead to-day just outside the limits of our camp. Upon investigation the fact was disclosed
James G. Blunt (search for this): chapter 10
r, at a small cost the water from this spring could be conducted through pipes into the houses for the convenience of families. Our camp is called Camp Moonlight, in honor of Colonel Thomas Moonlight, of the Eleventh Kansas infantry, who was General Blunt's Chief of Staff during the campaign in this section last fall. He is a brilliant officer, and, in personal appearance, one of the finest looking officers we had in the division. He is a Scotchman by birth, and is about six feet two inches ry day. The Indian division left Big Springs or Camp Moonlight on the morning of the 24th, and marched to Illinois River twelve miles south. This brings us within ten or twelve miles of Rhea's Mills, where the Army of the Frontier, under General Blunt, was encamped during the month of December. Colonel Phillips has named our camp here Camp Pomeroy, in honor of Senator Pomeroy, of Kansas. Should a Post office be established at this place after the war, it will probably take the name of
the Cherokee Nation. We wore sent out two days ago with the view of ascertaining as far as possible any contemplated movements of the enemy, as information had been received here via Fayetteville, that a rebel force of a thousand men, under Colonel Carroll, were encamped at Van Buren on the 24th, and were intending to move north on the state line road. From all the information we could get there is no reason to believe that Colonel Carroll's force will make any effort to operate north of the Colonel Carroll's force will make any effort to operate north of the mountains for several weeks. If Colonel M. LaRue Harrison, the commanding officer at Fayetteville, is a good fighter, he should be able to hold that post against three thousand men. He has probably better facilities for keeping himself informed in regard to the movements of the enemy south of him than Colonel Phillips has, for many refugee families are constantly coming into that place from all over the western part of the State. A good many of the families of the men of the two regiments sta
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